Local Florist Blanches at Golliwog Race Fury; Hervey Bay Shopkeeper Suffers over Favourite Doll

Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia), May 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

Local Florist Blanches at Golliwog Race Fury; Hervey Bay Shopkeeper Suffers over Favourite Doll


KRISTY

MARTIN

kristy.martin@frasercoastchronicle.com.au

GOLLY gosh!

Who would've thought one little doll could cause such a stir?

A Hervey Bay florist has shot to international fame because she is selling golliwogs.

After being named in a national newspaper article, Deanne Edwards from Prestige Flowers in Urangan has been bombarded with requests for radio and television interviews from around the country.

The touchy topic has even travelled overseas and appeared on the United Kingdom's Daily Mail website.

When the story broke, it suggested that the resurgence of the black dolls, which vanished from shelves after being labelled as racist, was somehow damaging to race relations in Australia.

But Ms Edwards says that is just a storm in a teacup. She sells golliwogs simply because she had them when she was a child and they bring back fond memories.

aI had one and my mum had one,a the mother of four said.

aMy children have them and they are just beautiful dolls.

aMy family and I don't have a prejudiced bone in our bodies.a

Ms Edwards said the golliwogs, which had recently been re-branded with more politically correct names like scallywags or golly girls, were walking off her shelves at a rate of about 20 each week. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Local Florist Blanches at Golliwog Race Fury; Hervey Bay Shopkeeper Suffers over Favourite Doll
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.