Inroads in Primary Care: A Pennsylvania Treatment Center Gains a Presence in Its Health System's Medical Clinics

By Michelle, Kwiec | Addiction Professional, September-October 2011 | Go to article overview

Inroads in Primary Care: A Pennsylvania Treatment Center Gains a Presence in Its Health System's Medical Clinics


Michelle, Kwiec, Addiction Professional


In September 2010, professionals at the Marworth addiction treatment organization in northeast Pennsylvania brought addiction treatment experience directly into the primary care setting. The goal was to help primary care providers more effectively treat patients who may have a problem with substance abuse. After only a few months of planning, I began assessing patients at two Geisinger Health System primary care practices.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Since Marworth is part of the Geisinger Health System, this partnership between addiction medicine and primary care came about relatively easily. Geisinger operates 39 primary care offices throughout central and northeast Pennsylvania, several of which are within 40 miles of Marworth's location in Waverly. In less than one year, the addiction medicine outreach program expanded to encompass four practices.

There are multiple challenges for all primary care providers when dealing with a patient suspected of substance abuse. First of all, their training in addiction medicine is limited. That in turn can affect their ability to diagnose a patient properly as a true addict, a pseudo-addict, or someone simply in need of more careful management of chronic pain.

"Primary care doctors are often the first to admit that we have a gap in training that puts us at a disadvantage when dealing with addiction," says John Gardner, MD, medical director and family physician at the Geisinger--Tunkhannock primary care clinic. "Fortunately, we have a strong relationship with our colleagues at Marworth."

Doctors at Geisinger routinely turn to the addiction experts at Marworth to learn more about treating addiction and managing prescriptions for their patients. With this line of communication already open, it was a natural next step to invite a Marworth expert into primary care practices fulltime.

"Both entities view this program as a value-added service for Geisinger patients," says Marworth vice president James Dougherty. "We all benefit from being part of a larger health system, and can now offer professional, individualized assessments and recommendations directly at the primary care level."

Marworth's operating budget pays my salary, while Geisinger's operating budget accounts for the office space at each clinic. Counseling sessions with me are free for the patient and are available only to established Geisinger patients.

Getting started

I first visited the targeted primary care sites and met with the providers, nurses and staff to assess their needs and expectations. Training in Geisinger's advanced electronic medical record (EMR) system was necessary to ensure that patients' progress would be properly recorded into their medical charts.

The first two Geisinger sites selected[logical not], Geisinger--Lake Scranton and Geisinger--Tunkhannock, [logical not]vary in patient population. Geisinger--Lake Scranton is home to 10 primary care providers and is located in Scranton, the urban center of Lackawanna County. Geisinger--Tunkhannock is a seven-provider practice serving a rural patient base in Wyoming County. However, physicians at both clinics have the same issues regarding patient substance abuse problems--trouble identifying addicted patients and handling non-compliance with prescription narcotic use agreements.

I initially offered office hours at each clinic site two-and-a-half days a week. Local primary care providers now had the ability to refer a patient quickly and easily to an onsite addiction expert. If I am holding office hours when a patient in question has a primary care appointment, the doctors often are able to get the patient in to see me within minutes.

The new program grew slowly. There were more referrals at the more urban Geisinger--Lake Scranton clinic. After six months, I noticed my referrals were dropping significantly. After discussion with the medical directors at each site, they determined that each site's patient load had been "cycled through," meaning I had seen most of their current patients with an obvious need for addiction assessment. …

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