Blended E-Learning in Higher Education: Research on Students' Perspective

By Zuvic-Butorac, Marta; Roncevic, Nena et al. | Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology, Annual 2011 | Go to article overview

Blended E-Learning in Higher Education: Research on Students' Perspective


Zuvic-Butorac, Marta, Roncevic, Nena, Nemcanin, Damir, Nebic, Zoran, Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology


Introduction

As education is becoming a ubiquitous service delivered anywhere and anytime over the global network, the higher education institutions, although campus oriented and without distance learners, try to implement elements of e-learning in traditional course delivery, in order to prepare their students, as well as the institution, for the future participation in education (Bonk, 2009; McCradie, 2003). In this process, there is also a hope that such changes will also induce some changes in traditional organization, planning and management of educational process.

University of Rijeka is one of the seven universities in Croatia, middle-sized with respect to number of students ([approximately equal to] 17 500) and academics ([approximately equal to] 1 100). As dynamic and change- oriented institution, in its policy documents in 2007 the University defined the strategic goals, particularly related to teaching and learning (T&L) process and improvement of its overall quality. Thus the specific strategic objectives were set up: to increase the efficiency of studying, to modernize curricula and syllabi in the context of the Bologna declaration, to ensure the compatibility with international educational systems, to improve quality of teaching and learning through implementation of learning-outcomes oriented curricula, More over the goal was to increase the inter-university and international cooperation and to enhance the student and teacher mobility and to improve student services. Additionally motivated by the poor use of ICT in teaching and learning process, together with changes in curricula mandated by the Bologna process, the University management decided to enable the activities for e-learning implementation (Zuvic-Butorac & Nebic, 2009). As University of Rijeka is campus based, the e-learning implementation was seen in the form of transforming pre-existing traditional classroom content delivery to combination of classroom and online delivery (blended learning), through setting up of e-courses which will support the classroom activities.

The process of implementing e-learning tools as a support for traditional classroom teaching started at the University of Rijeka at the beginning of 2008, following the strategic principles (Bates, 1999; Duderstadt, 2003; Ellis, 2007; Hanna, 2003) adapted to local environment (Zuvic-Butorac, 2009). Since the time of the beginning of e-learning use and implementation of blended learning, the process has been constantly supported (through development of support services and education of teaching staff) and assessed for quality, but only from the institutional, teacher's and support services' perspective. Assuming that quality of the teaching and learning process is not something that is delivered to a student by e-learning provider, but rather constitutes a process of co-production between the learner and learning environment, we considered equally important to asses both the learner's perspective as well as learning environment aspects. In broader sense, the learning environment nowadays and particularly with the e-learning employed, is very complex and consists of many elements which contribute to its quality. It starts from the characteristics of the e-learning platform, technological and educational user's support, course design and T&L methods and tutoring employed, all the way up to institutional support and management policies towards all participants in the educational process. Assessing the quality is therefore as much as important for the students, as for the university management, support services and the academics, as teachers, authors and tutors. Understanding that student's perception regarding e-learning is one of the most important steps in developing and implementing a successful e-learning environment (Keller & Cernerud, 2002; Wagner & Flannery, 2004), we conducted the study of student's perception and e-learning acceptance, presented here. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Blended E-Learning in Higher Education: Research on Students' Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.