Designing and Implementing a Learning Strategy Plan: Determine a Good Approach for Achieving Learning Objectives by Developing a Plan for a Clearly Defined Learning Strategy

By Neal, Bruno | T&D, June 2012 | Go to article overview

Designing and Implementing a Learning Strategy Plan: Determine a Good Approach for Achieving Learning Objectives by Developing a Plan for a Clearly Defined Learning Strategy


Neal, Bruno, T&D


For a while now, instructional designers and learning professionals have been well aware of the importance of writing learning objectives that reflect the learners' needs and represent organizational goals. Several methods are used to capture specific learning objectives that can be measured after implementing a learning or performance improvement solution. However, are you sure that you are following an appropriate learning strategy? A well-defined learning strategy will determine the approach for achieving the learning objectives.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

What is it?

I have created a model for a learning strategy plan, which combines Six Sigma, Malcolm Baldrige, and Andragogy (adult learning) principles. The model consists of a five-phase process that encompasses learning, and includes instructional design models, media, methods, technologies, and learning styles. Your learning strategy plan should align all those components to ensure that they help to achieve the organization's goals.

Guidelines

The five phases of the learning strategy plan are approach, deployment, learning, integration, and results.

Approach. Make sure you understand the organization and audience well. Identify the method to be used to implement the learning strategy. The selected learning and educational methods, principles, theories, and models should be repeatable and based on reliable data and information. This consistency will make your process reliable and systematic.

In this phase you will need to:

* choose what ISD model you want to use

* analyze the audience needs and organizational goals

* verify source availability

* interview subject matter experts

* determine whether you need to design a learning solution to address skills and knowledge, or a performance improvement solution to address attitude and behavior

* identify whether you should incorporate some parallel initiatives such as organizational change management, informal learning, coaching, or mentoring

* identify learning objectives and business objectives

* consolidate your learning strategy plan into one document.

Deployment. Start implementing the learning strategy plan established during the approach phase. The plan will need to refer to the extent to which your approach is applied in addressing the education and learning strategies selected for the project, and how to apply this approach consistently. Deployment is evaluated on the basis of the breadth and depth of implementation of the approach to relevant work units, teams, and departments throughout your organization.

In this phase you will need to:

* develop training material

* define strategic moments for the use of social media and informal learning initiatives

* coordinate the logistics of synchronous webinar or instructor-led training

* implement evaluation tools to measure the learning strategy

* survey your clientele and identify lesson-learned key points.

Learning. Your learning strategy plan should focus on two distinct kinds of learning: organizational and personal. Organizational learning is achieved through research and development, evaluation and improvement cycles, workforce and stakeholder ideas and input, best-practice sharing, and benchmarking.

To be effective, learning needs to be embedded in the way your organization operates. This means that learning is a regular part of daily work; is practiced at personal, work unit, and organizational levels; results in solving problems at their source ("root cause"); is focused on building and sharing knowledge throughout your organization; and is driven by opportunities to effect significant, meaningful change and to innovate.

In this phase, collect the client survey results sent at the end of the deployment phase. The lesson-learned key points will help you to identify gaps in your learning strategy process. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Designing and Implementing a Learning Strategy Plan: Determine a Good Approach for Achieving Learning Objectives by Developing a Plan for a Clearly Defined Learning Strategy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.