A HISTORY OF ENGLAND V FRANCE; England Have Generally Had the Better of Their Meetings against Their French Neighbours -- but Not in Recent Times. ALEX KAY Looks at Some of the Key Cross-Channel Clashes

Daily Mail (London), June 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

A HISTORY OF ENGLAND V FRANCE; England Have Generally Had the Better of Their Meetings against Their French Neighbours -- but Not in Recent Times. ALEX KAY Looks at Some of the Key Cross-Channel Clashes


Byline: ALEX KAY

THE FIRST MEETING

FRANCE 1-4 ENGLAND

May 10, 1923, Stade Pershing, Paris

IN THE days when there was no permanent manager -- an FA official and coach took charge -- England travelled to Paris for the first game between the sides. And they returned home with plenty of reason to feel smug. Lt-Col Kenneth 'Jackie' Hegan (left) scored the first and last goals as England ran out 4-1 winners. He scored four goals in his four caps.

FRANCE: Chayrigues, Mony, Gamblin (c), Mistral, Hugues, Bonnardel, Dewaquez, Darques, Dangles, Bard, Dubly. Scorer: Dewaquez.

ENGLAND: Alderson, Cresswell, Jones, Plum, Seddon, Barton, Osborne, Buchan (c), Creek, Hartley, Hegan. Scorers: Hegan 2, Buchan, Creek.

ATTENDANCE: 30,000.

THE FAMOUS FIVE

ENGLAND 5-0 FRANCE

March 12, 1969, Wembley

REMEMBER that special Geoff Hurst hat-trick against the old enemy in the shadow of the Twin Towers? No, not that one. It was a friendly when Hurst (left) scored his other treble for England, all three coming in the second half. Two were penalties as Alf Ramsey's team cruised to a 5-0 win. Francis Lee and Terry Cooper made their debuts.

ENGLAND: Banks, Newton, Cooper, Mullery, J Charlton, Moore (c), Lee, Bell, Hurst, Peters, O'Grady. Scorers: Hurst 3, O'Grady, Lee.

FRANCE: Carnus, Djorkaeff, Bosquier (c), Lemerre, Rostagni, Bonnel, Hernet, Simon, Michel, Loubet, Bereta.

ATTENDANCE: 85,000.

1966 AND ALL THAT

ENGLAND 2-0 FRANCE

World Cup, July 20, 1966, Wembley

ALREADY qualified for the World Cup quarter-finals, England needed a win to make sure they won the group and avoided West Germany in the last eight. The victory was never in doubt against the weak French, with Roger Hunt netting twice. The first was a tap-in (above) that France thought was offside, the second a header that keeper Marcel Aubour should have done better with. Apparently England went on to do rather well in the tournament.

ENGLAND: Banks, Cohen, Wilson, Stiles, J Charlton, Moore (c), Callaghan, Greaves, B Charlton, Hunt, Peters. Scorers: Hunt 2.

FRANCE: Aubour, Artelesa (c), Djorkaeff, Bonnel, Bosquier, Budzynski, Herbin, Herbert, Gondet, Simon, Hausser.

ATTENDANCE: 98,270.

ROCKING ROBSON

ENGLAND 3-1 FRANCE

World Cup, June 16, 1982, Estadio San Mames, Bilbao

WITH England wearing red and France white (kit choice could be odd back then too) Bryan Robson (left) pounced after just 27 seconds of the campaign to set Ron Greenwood's side on their way. Gerard Soler equalised but Robson rose to score a second before Paul Mariner sealed the win. England won their group but draws against Spain and Germany saw them exit at the next stage.

ENGLAND: Shilton, Mills (c), Sansom, Thompson, Butcher, Robson, Coppell, Francis, Mariner, Rix, Wilkins. …

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