Premature Disclosures Smack of Trial by Publicity

Manila Bulletin, January 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Premature Disclosures Smack of Trial by Publicity


MANILA, Philippines - Senators led by Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile Thursday dared congressmen-prosecutors to withdraw their impeachment complaint against Chief Justice Renato C. Corona because their disclosure of supposed evidence against Corona smacks of trial by publicity. Enrile said the so-called pieces of evidence, particularly a P14.5-million condominium unit at The Fort in Taguig City the Coronas supposedly own, should be presented during the impeachment trial, not publicly discussed before the trial starts on January 16. Enrile advised Iloilo Rep. Neil Tupas, the one who led his colleagues in filing the eight-article impeachment case against Corona, to study his law. Tupas, the chairman of the House of Representatives justice committee, got Enrile's ire when he said the "gag order" on prosecutors and others named in the Senate impeachment rule does not apply to him because he has not yet entered his appearance as one of the House prosecutors. During a press conference recently, Tupas showed to media representatives a copy of the deed of sale of a condominium unit supposedly owned by the Coronas. Other senators were equally critical of the prosecutors. Sen. Panfilo M. Lacson warned members of the House prosecution team that the Senate can sanction them if they insist in making public the pieces of evidence they have against Corona. As a collegial body, the Senate as an impeachment court could decide what to do with them if they violate the Senate impeachment rules, Lacson said. He added that the Senate has already assumed jurisdiction over the eight-article impeachment complaint when Corona and the House prosecutors submitted their answers. "If they persist in making comments or making public the evidence (against Corona) that they are supposedly holding, I myself will put into a vote a contempt citation," he said. Rule 18 of the Senate Rules of Procedure on Impeachment Trials, Lacson said, clearly prohibits senator-judges, as well as prosecutors, the person impeached, their counsels and witnesses "from making any comments and disclosures in public pertaining to the merits of a pending impeachment trial.'' "They should be able to dissociate or distinguish themselves as representatives elected by the people and as prosecutors in an impeachment trial. They mixed it. They said they there is a need for them to tell their constituents the evidence they are holding (against Corona). What they forgot is that they have duties and responsibilities as prosecutors and they are bound by the rules of impeachment," he said. Sen. Gregorio B. Honasan II said if the prosecutors insist on revealing in public evidence against the Chief Justice, the Senate should give them a slap on the wrist. Honasan said the Senate will meet to decide what sanction to impose. Senate President Pro Tempore Jose "Jinggoy" Estrada said the prosecutors were "atat na atat na" (too eager). Both Honasan and Sen. Panfilo M. Lacson noted that the Senate Rules of Procedure on Impeachment unambiguously prohibit senator-judges, as well as prosecutors, the person impeached, their counsels and witnesses "from making any comments and disclosures in pubic pertaining to the merits of a pending impeachment trial." Honasan said public presentation of evidence against an accused "might sway public opinion." But Tupas argued the Rules of Senate Impeachment Procedures only apply if the direct merits of the case were being discussed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Premature Disclosures Smack of Trial by Publicity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.