The Mail


'The Greatest Day of her Life'

The coronation of Queen Elizabeth took place while I was in primary school. A public holiday was declared for all nations in the mighty British Empire, and even my small hometown participated with a flowery parade. My father painted a large portrait of the youthful queen and placed it at the front of the first float. The whole town embraced the joyous occasion. Like Queen Victoria, Queen Elizabeth's remarkable, lengthy reign continues with dignity and pride. Long live the diamond queen.

Tan Boon-Tee, Kemaman, Malaysia

As a British expat, I have a nostalgic sense of admiration and affection for the queen. As an American and a human being, I find any type of monarchy not only a blatant insult to the freedom of all mankind, but also a disregard to the mantra that all men are assumed to be equals. I don't, however, blame Elizabeth Windsor for her position and title; she herself is a prisoner of a primitive system that has no place in today's modern times.

Edward Porter, Agua Dulce, Calif.

'The Cost of Hope'

I truly appreciated Amanda Bennett's thought-provoking article on end-of-life care. Yet as a health-care professional, I must say that her assertion that higher rates of reimbursement are "one reason the very ill and elderly get moved to hospitals from ordinary long-term-care facilities" is a misinterpretation of the system. Reimbursement has nothing to do with it. We are all responsible for our own health care, and we all have an equal say in the type and degree of intervention we are willing to endure. We can all take part in reducing the cost of health care, and most likely deciding the fate of our last days, if we are brave enough to educate ourselves on current health-care interventions and subsequent quality-of-life questions. …

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