Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Lizard Slithers on without Endangered-Species Protection

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 14, 2012 | Go to article overview

Lizard Slithers on without Endangered-Species Protection


Byline: Stephen Dinan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Obama administration backtracked Wednesday and announced it will not declare the dunes sagebrush lizard an endangered species, saying voluntary efforts by New Mexico and Texas have headed off the need for the federal government to step in.

The move breaks new ground in the decades-old Endangered Species Act by relying on conservation agreements between those two states and oil and gas companies, which have promised to take steps to preserve the lizard's habitat. Without those agreements, the federal government said it would have been forced to invoke the act.

Environmental groups criticized the decision, saying the Interior Department caved to energy companies and ignored the science that shows the lizard's habitat is disappearing - which they said should have automatically triggered the act.

But Interior Secretary Kenneth L. Salazar said the voluntary conservation agreements will end up protecting nearly 90 percent of the lizard's habitat, which he noted is the fundamental goal of the federal endangered species law.

The effort is nothing short of historic, he said.

He called the deal a template for working on endangered species conflicts in other parts of the country. That could be welcome news to landowners and businesses that havegrown increasingly worried about clashing with the Obama administration over the Endangered Species Act.

The law has been controversial since President Nixon signed it in 1973. It is credited with helping restore some iconic species such as the bald eagle and whooping crane, but opponents say some listings have unnecessarily hurt industry. Republicans in Congress have called for the law to be updated to prevent environmentalists from abusing it.

The dune sagebrush lizard lives in shinnery oak grasslands in New Mexico and Texas - areas that also are being explored for oil and natural gas.

In December 2010, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed listing the lizard as endangered, which would trigger special habitat protections.

But the service Wednesday withdrew the proposal, saying the habitat is not as endangered as officials had first thought, chiefly because of industry promises to protect the land.

Based on an analysis of these conservation plans and the protections they provide, we have determined the lizard is no longer in danger of extinction and is not likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future, said Dan Ashe, the service's director.

Under separate voluntary agreements reached in recent months in Texas and New Mexico, oil and gas companies agreed not to explore in prime but fragile habitat, and in some cases landowners agreed to try to restore damaged habitat.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lizard Slithers on without Endangered-Species Protection
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.