Integrative Education: Focus on Technology and Cultures

By Kaluf, Kevin J. | Children's Technology and Engineering, May 2012 | Go to article overview

Integrative Education: Focus on Technology and Cultures


Kaluf, Kevin J., Children's Technology and Engineering


introduction

Here's a curious question: Have you used at least one Apple[TM] product today? The innovations and ideas of Steve Jobs and Apple[TM] have permeated our modern-day culture so extensively that it would be challenging for most people to avoid contact with an Apple[TM] creation during the course of the day. As consumers and users of information technology, these Apple[TM] products have altered how humans interact with the computer innovations developed by Jobs and the Apple[TM] team. The cultural influence we are experiencing today through the integration of these new technologies is similar to the cultural influences early civilizations experienced through construction technologies. Similar to innovations introduced by Jobs, the ancient Egyptians and the Teotihuacanos of Mexico both utilized innovative practices for their time to construct amazing pyramids that influenced their respective daily practices and culture.

modern-day culture and technological influence

Many people look at the late Steve Jobs as one of the most--if not the most--influential architects of our modern culture this century. His work and leadership at Apple[TM] revolutionized how people interact with the electronic technologies used daily. There are five very important ways that Jobs changed the way people work, play, and socialize in the 21st century. The first of these was changing the way people look at design. Jobs was a perfectionist who always cared about how a product looked, in addition to how it performed. In addition to the functionality of the device, Jobs contemplated minimalist design and his customers' aesthetic desires.

Second, Jobs changed the way we listen to music. In 2003, Jobs wanted to help curb piracy by launching iTunes, the digital content service that charged fees for music bought online or via Apple's[TM] digital music player, the iPod. Today, iTunes is the largest online music retailer in the world, with over 200 million users and 15 billion downloaded songs.

Third, Jobs redefined the usage of the personal computer for the average consumer. Jobs revolutionized the way people work, communicate, and create through the use of Mac personal computers. Macs made it easy for everyone to become a "techie."

Fourth, through the creation of the iPhone in 2007, Jobs introduced a device that pioneered the smartphone while utilizing a minimalist design, a sleek case, and a touchscreen operating system.

Finally, with the launch of the iPad, Jobs combined both smartphone technology and personal computing in a powerful, yet mobile, device. Steve Jobs was an expert at understanding our culture's busy lifestyles, and he was able to assist in the managing of those lifestyles through his technologies.

resources

Two video resources can be used to show students how the utilization of technology can envelop and integrate two distant cultures in the same period of history. Egyptian Pyramids, a History Channel Modern Marvel video, provides students with an inside look into the history and culture of ancient Egypt and its pyramids. The culture of Egypt revolved around the ruler, called the Pharaoh, as the people's supreme ruler and god. The Pharaohs wanted to be remembered by their people, so they had them construct large structures to serve as tombs for their "journey to the afterlife." These structures were designed and built as square pyramids, and their measurements were extremely accurate, both in size and in their locations directionally. While no one is certain of the methods the builders used, it is surmised that the pyramids were either constructed by an extensive slave labor force, or the average Egyptian had to give years of service to the Pharaoh's building project. As a result of this focus on construction as lasting memorials, hundreds of pyramids of various sizes can be found throughout Egypt, and the daily lives of the ancient Egyptians were altered by their work on them.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Integrative Education: Focus on Technology and Cultures
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.