The Religion Embedded in US Foreign Policy

By Olinger, John | National Catholic Reporter, June 8, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Religion Embedded in US Foreign Policy


Olinger, John, National Catholic Reporter


Two years before the United States went to war with Mexico in 1846, one could read in the Family Christian Almanack an article, "Expenses of War," in which the author added together the costs of America's wars from 1776 to 1815. He observed that it would have been better to spend the money "to furnish every family in the world with a Bible: to provide the means of common education for all its children, and to support one minister of the Gospel for every thousand souls."

While the math may be suspect, the sentiment could not be clearer: the juxtaposition of war and its cost with the Gospel and its benefit. The author's universal view stands out. The comparison is not limited to the United States; no, there is a clear missionary goal here as well.

This lies at the heart of Andrew Pre-ston's magisterial--832-page--survey, Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith: Religion in American War and Diplomacy. Begun as President George W. Bush prepared his faithful for war in Iraq, the shadow of that yet-to-be-accounted-for misadventure hangs over this book. Preston wondered why Bush used religious rhetoric and imagery and asked: Was this usual, did other presidents do this? His short answer is that religious rhetoric and the underlying sentiment were firmly embedded in American civic life from the first English footsteps on the continent. One might also observe that such invocations are effective, at least initially.

Studies of American foreign relations are countless, as are studies of religion in America, but Preston traverses less familiar territory, the interplay of the two. He detects two major currents running through this history. The sword of the spirit wages war in the name of God and is sustained by the idea of American exceptionalism all the rage among some in the current electoral climate and manifest destiny. The shield of faith, somewhat benignly neglected these days, promotes peace and is expressed in anti-interventionism, anti-imperialism and internationalism.

Preston's task is not easy. Religion in America is not a static subject. For instance, New England Protestants wielded the sword of the spirit against two enemies, Native Americans and the Roman Catholicism embodied in New France to the north. Preston calls colonial America a reformation society, stressing individual conscience, born in opposition to the authoritarian church of Rome. He adeptly traces the changes of the nation's religious fabric, weaving in new faiths, changing faiths and attitudes. He manages to find common themes that emerge at critical junctures. He notes that as colonial Protestants believed they could not live surrounded by Catholic tyranny and survive as Protestants, in the 20th century Americans came to believe, whether in 1941 or 1961, they could not survive as a democracy surrounded by tyranny, whether fascist or communist.

It would be wrong to assume that religion merely accompanied our diplomats and warriors. …

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