In Academia Today, Financial Savvy Trumps Curriculum Vitae

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 22, 2012 | Go to article overview

In Academia Today, Financial Savvy Trumps Curriculum Vitae


Byline: Ben Wolfgang, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The job description of today's university president increasingly resembles that of a CEO, with the molding of young minds and overseeing a community of scholars taking a distinct backseat to balancing the books and raising cash, academic analysts say.

As the ongoing clash at the University of Virginia demonstrates, college presidents are expected, by their boards and by the public, to make hard choices and trim costs wherever possible.

That has led some universities, faced with greater financial challenges and more competition than ever, to look outside the scholarly world, to those with strong business or even political backgrounds, for their next president.

On Thursday, Indiana's Purdue bagged one of the state's biggest political heavyweights, announcing that Gov. Mitch Daniels will take over that school's presidency when he leaves the governor's mansion in six months.

It was the latest evidence that, for many schools, the traditional school president with the academic resume is, in many cases, no longer enough.

The most striking change has been an increasing number of presidents coming from backgrounds that are not academic. They're coming from law, from business, and theydon't have an understanding of a commitment to the academic enterprise, said Robert Kreiser, senior program officer with the American Association of University Presidents (AAUP). Their emphasis has to do with corporate values. More and more, unfortunately, they're seen not as educators, but as managers and fundraisers.

The shifting landscape

The AAUP has been among the most vocal critics of the recent ouster of University of Virginia President Teresa Sullivan, whose removal has sparked student protests and fueled a larger debate about exactly what's expected of college presidents in 2012.

Ms. Sullivan, a decorated scholar who previously served as a professor, led the sociology department at the University of Texas and held other academic positions, has been replaced by Carl P. Zeithaml, the dean of the school's School of Commerce. He also holds a bachelor's degree in economics and a doctorate in strategic management.

While the university's board of visitors has been coy about exactly what led to the rift with Ms. Sullivan, speculation has centered on her supposed unwillingness to make severe, top-down budget cuts - a growing necessity at many universities struggling with reduced funding from state governments and trying to stem the tide of ever-rising tuition costs.

No one has questioned Ms. Sullivan's academic background; in years past, those qualifications may have been enough.

It used to be that presidents were chosen on their academic credentials. But, then again, the main job used to be managing the curricula, said Patricia Cormier, former president of Virginia's Longwood University. She now runs the New Presidents' Academy, a leadership-training conference for college leaders, operated by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. …

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