Managerial Skills: An Analysis of Roles and Learning in Corporate Business

By Kumar, Raj; Syal, Hemant | Political Economy Journal of India, January-June 2012 | Go to article overview

Managerial Skills: An Analysis of Roles and Learning in Corporate Business


Kumar, Raj, Syal, Hemant, Political Economy Journal of India


Introduction

A Manager is the person responsible for planning and directing the work of a group of individuals, monitoring their work, and taking corrective actions when necessary. For many people, this is their first step into a management career. Managerial effectiveness is the basis of any organization's growth. Managers may direct workers directly or they may direct several supervisors who direct the workers. They are the individuals charged with examining the workflows, coordinating efforts, meeting goals and providing leadership. A manager must be familiar with the work of all the groups he/she supervises, but need not be the best in any or all of the areas. It is more important for a manager to know how to manage the workers than to know how to do their work well.

In 21st century business environment, the leaders of business enterprises are known as New Age Managers. Keeping in view the changing paradigm of corporate governance, they are supposed to be conversant with the latest economic and non-economic tools so as to handle the highly competitive business situation with confidence and success. In the present highly competitive global market situation which is dominated by corporate governance linked with corporate excellence or performance, the New Age Managers have to perform a role of a leader, trained in such a way that they develop the core competency to handle the complex business problems. In this context acquiring requisite managerial skills becomes the primary task of the business leaders.

In this paper, an attempt has been made to highlight these managerial skills, managerial roles, functions of managers, and learning techniques to become a successful manager.

Managerial Skills: Definition and Characteristics

Managerial effectiveness is very important for the survival and growth of an organisation. It is difficult to define managerial effectiveness in concrete terms. Many perceive it within a particular frame of reference. Decisions about effectiveness are bound to be situational and contingent upon the definition and perspectives of those making the judgment. Managerial effectiveness has been studied with different perspectives.

The traditional model emphasizes the ability to set and achieve goals where it is implicitly assumed that managerial effectiveness leads to organisational effectiveness. The organisational competency based approach implies that there is long-term future orientation that accounts for both external and internal influences on the organizations.

The individual competency based approach to managerial effectiveness focuses upon the individual rather than the organization. The purpose of this approach is to develop transferable management skills that are applicable across different circumstances both nationally and internationally.

Effectiveness is best seen as something a manager produces from a situation by managing it appropriately, producing the results or meeting the targets in every sphere of the activities of organizations. The manager's job is linked with three major dimensions--technical, conceptual and human. The productivity of any organization can be increased by the effective management of all the three dimensions and specially by managing the conceptual and human dimensions of management. All managers need to work with and through subordinates to optimize organizational performance. Therefore, certain behavioural skills are required of individuals if they are to be effective as managers.

Managers have many resources at their disposal and the quality of work is dependent on how well these resources have been used. The performance of a manager can be measured by the extent to which goals that are important to the group and organizations are met through the productive efforts of subordinates. In other words, effective management is the culmination of synergy of effectiveness of individual managers in the organization. …

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