Welcome to the 'Sheeniverse'

By Brown, Tina | Newsweek, July 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

Welcome to the 'Sheeniverse'


Brown, Tina, Newsweek


Byline: Tina Brown

Two wild men hang out together.

One insane celebrity deserves another. The writer of the piece this week on Charlie Sheen is Michael Ware, the blaspheming, crooked-nosed Australian war correspondent whose unnerving reporting from Iraq for CNN was gotten by living on the edge of death for 10 years. "You've put me in a f--king craphouse hotel that even in BAGHDAD would have been considered a S--THOLE," he shouted down the phone at me in the course of a fee discussion that better resembled a hostage negotiation.

What Michael Ware has done in the line of fire makes Apocalypse Now seem like a Boy Scout training video. In 2004 he was held at gunpoint by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi's murderous thugs who intended to execute him on video until his Baath Party guards negotiated his release. In 2008 he filmed a shooting of a young Iraqi man by U.S. troops. The bullet did not immediately kill him. "We all spent the next 20 minutes listening to his tortured breath as he died," Ware told an Australian newspaper. A friend, journalist John Martinkus, says Ware became "obsessed" with the footage, watching it "over and over again," haunted by the stark moral choice between helping the dying man and performing as a journalist. (The footage was deemed too graphic to air.) Severe (and understandable) posttraumatic stress triggered a leave of absence from CNN, and eventually his resignation.

In the course of editing The Daily Beast over the past few years, I made repeated efforts to get the gifted Ware, self-exiled since 2010 in Australia and dealing with his drug problem, back to writing. His tortured replies spoke of not being ready. It was the death of the great photojournalist Tim Hetherington, who was killed by a rocket-propelled grenade fired by pro-Gaddafi forces in Libya in 2011, that finally--after a series of late-night emails--enabled me to pull a great piece out of him for our newly acquired Newsweek. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Welcome to the 'Sheeniverse'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.