Digital Power List: Virologists

Newsweek, July 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

Digital Power List: Virologists


VIROLOGISTS

In the hive of the Internet, they are the ones who make the buzz.

Chris Poole

Founder, 4chan

Countless Internet memes (like LOLcats and Rage Comics) can be traced back to his image board, founded by Poole at age 15. And so can Anonymous, the hacker collective.

Matt Drudge

Editor, The Drudge Report

Fifteen years after his Monica Lewinsky-scandal heyday, the reclusive, fedora-sporting Drudge still drives staggering amounts of traffic and sets the cable-news agenda.

Andy Carvin

Senior strategist, NPR

Hired in 2006 to help the radio network embrace social media, Carvin became a "one-man Twitter news bureau" during the Arab Spring, averaging up to 400 tweets a day.

Ze Frank

Internet artist, zefrank.com

In February, the performance artist turned to Kickstarter to raise funds to revive his popular Web series. He logged $146,752 in 11 days. His YouTube videos have been viewed more than 4 million times.

Ben Huh

CEO, Cheezburger Network

Huh specializes in turning silly ideas (putting captions on cat pictures) into real business. The I Can Has Cheezburger? site, which he bought for $2 million, now gets 24 million visitors a month.

Sean Parker

Managing partner, The Founders Fund

The Napster-founding, Facebook-discovering playboy billionaire has a nose for success. His Airtime video chat service is--unlike its competitors--mercifully free of nudity. …

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