The News on Abuse

By Graff, E. J. | Newsweek, July 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

The News on Abuse


Graff, E. J., Newsweek


Byline: E.J. Graff

Child molestation is on the wane.

We're all horrified by the recent accounts of child sexual abuse--from the conviction of former Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky to stories about serial abusers at the elite New York prep school Horace Mann. So it may help to keep in mind this rarely reported fact: child sexual abuse has been dropping for the last 20 years. University of New Hampshire professor David Finkelhor, widely considered the premier researcher on crimes against children, reports that substantiated cases of child sexual abuse have declined 53 percent since 1990. Numbers are still obscenely high: Finkelhor finds that 21 percent of all girls and at least 3 (but more likely 10) percent of boys are sexually victimized by age 17. But it used to be worse.

Finkelhor believes the drop isn't primarily because of stricter laws and harsher punishments. Rather, he points to increased awareness and better offender treatment.

With each scandal, more Americans have realized how serious the problem is. Churches, teams, and schools all now specify the rules of engagement for adults and children. We're alert to the signs of abuse and know to report them immediately. We've learned that the stigma should be on the offender, not the victim, and that offenders can appear to be upstanding fathers, priests, and teachers. And so abusers are stopped earlier--and more children are saved from the cycle of shame, reducing the risk they'll become abusers themselves.

All that awareness has a second benefit: catching offenders sooner means they can be helped more effectively. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The News on Abuse
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.