Emma Stone, Revealed

By Stern, Marlow | Newsweek, July 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

Emma Stone, Revealed


Stern, Marlow, Newsweek


Byline: Marlow Stern

'The Amazing Spider-Man' star on her reality-TV origins, Ryan Gosling, and creating a teen advice column.

I heard your trademark raspy voice came from a childhood malady?

I have a hiatal hernia, which is a hernia that you're born with, and I had terrible stomachaches the first six months of my life, so I screamed myself hoarse every day when I was awake. To this day, my mom is sent into violent shudders if she hears a baby crying like that! I gave myself nodules before I could talk, so my voice was at this pitch as a toddler.

Not a lot of people know you got your start on The New Partridge Family.

It was totally, 100 percent a reality show. My mom had never pushed me to audition for anything, but she saw a commercial on TV for it and said, "You look like Susan Dey a little, and just dyed your hair brown ... Why don't you give this a shot? I have a weird feeling." I did it and ended up winning. I don't regret it for a minute.

How were you cast as Gwen Stacy in The Amazing Spider-Man (in theaters July 3)?

I worked with Sony on Superbad, Zombieland, and Easy A, and they had talked with me about Mary Jane originally. When it came back around to Gwen Stacy, they asked if I'd audition, and Andrew [Garfield] had already been cast [as Spider-Man]. I looked into the saga of Gwen Stacy and it was stunning--a huge slice of pop-culture history.

Director Marc Webb told me your chemistry with Andrew from the first audition was electric.

I could feel there was something there, and we were able to do improv in the audition, which was great. …

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