Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization

By Fronda, Michael P. | The Historian, Summer 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization


Fronda, Michael P., The Historian


Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization. By Richard Miles. (New York, N.Y.: Viking, 2010. Pp. xvii, 521. $35.00.)

Carthage grew from a Phoenician colony into a cultural, economic, and imperial center and Rome's chief rival in the western Mediterranean. Its most famous general, Hannibal, came within a whisker of defeating Rome, but, after a century of conflict, including three major wars, it was a triumphant Roman general who oversaw the sack of Carthage and, effectively, the destruction of this ancient civilization. Richard Miles tells this epic story in a lively, single-volume historical overview. The book is aimed at a more general audience. This does not mean that it is not a scholarly work. It is well researched, argued, and documented. It will, however, appeal more to the educated layman than to an expert in the field.

It is organized chronologically, beginning with the reign of Hiram I of Tyre It. 969-936 BC] and concluding with the city's destruction in 146 BC, with a postscript on the enduring importance of Carthage in the Roman imagination. Several important themes emerge. Although Carthage developed along its own unique cultural trajectory, its Phoenician heritage remained central to Carthaginian identity, especially in the area of religion, as evinced by the continued importance of the worship of Melqart. Carthage typified the cultural melting pot of the Mediterranean, both absorbing aspects of Greek culture and exerting cultural influence in Sardinia, Sicily, and Italy, including Rome; e.g., Miles argues that the terra cotta statues from Sant'Omobono represent Heracles-Melqart and Aphrodite-Astarte (109). Although ancient authors tended to emphasize Carthaginian-Greek and Carthaginian-Roman hostility, interactions were often peaceful and cooperative, with Carthage engaged in wide-ranging international trade from an early date. Formal imperial structures were slow to develop within the Carthaginian sphere of influence.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Carthage Must Be Destroyed: The Rise and Fall of an Ancient Civilization
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?