Irons Goes Henry IV into Battle; after Almost a Decade, Jeremy Irons Is Returning to Shakespeare, as King Henry IV in a New BBC Series. Acting's Good, He Tells Kate Whiting, but What He Really Loves Doing Is Tinkering with His Boat

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), June 30, 2012 | Go to article overview

Irons Goes Henry IV into Battle; after Almost a Decade, Jeremy Irons Is Returning to Shakespeare, as King Henry IV in a New BBC Series. Acting's Good, He Tells Kate Whiting, but What He Really Loves Doing Is Tinkering with His Boat


Byline: Kate Whiting

IN A snow-covered field just a stone's throw from the M25, Jeremy Irons, Tom Hiddleston and a heavily disguised Simon Russell Beale are doing battle.

It's a surreal sight, as Jeremy and Tim, in chain mail and red capes, charge back and forth on horses through a throng of armour-clad men, while Russell Beale, in a fat-suit and clasping a spear, runs comically away from just about everyone in his path.

On hills either side of the small valley are camps of ancient tents and, were it not for the camera crew in modern-day dress, you could almost imagine it was Medieval England. Even the sounds of the M25 have been muffled, much to director Richard Eyre's relief, thanks to the snow.

But this is January, 2012, and the scene being filmed is the climax of Shakespeare's Henry IV Part I, where the future Henry V, young Prince Hal, will defeat rebel leader Hotspur, ultimately taking his place in history.

Some time earlier, in the comfort of a heated modern tent, which doubles as wardrobe and canteen for the battling mob, Jeremy Irons, who's playing the titular king, settles down to discuss his first Shakespeare play since the 2004 Merchant Of Venice film.

He looks every inch the lauded British thespian, dressed in a red woolly jumper, Middle Eastern scarf, cords and high black boots, with a backwards cap on his head - chic but cosy.

"Shakespeare is wonderful to come back to, you forget how fertile his language is," says the 63-year-old, in those deep, familiar tones.

"You get used to working in film, where language is spare and often not well written and suddenly you get back to this language, his use of rhythm, the choice of words, the way he changes from one thought to another on a sixpence, which is glorious.

"It's like driving an Aston Martin and you think, 'Oh yes, this can do anything, once I get to know how to do it'. Once you've done some of those big roles, even though you might not have done it for a few years, you know the possibilities, you know what you're looking for - which is to make it sound completely colloquial and understandable to an audience."

Indeed, with their season of four Shakespeare history plays, entitled The Hollow Crown, it's the BBC's mission to appeal to as wide an audience as possible. …

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Irons Goes Henry IV into Battle; after Almost a Decade, Jeremy Irons Is Returning to Shakespeare, as King Henry IV in a New BBC Series. Acting's Good, He Tells Kate Whiting, but What He Really Loves Doing Is Tinkering with His Boat
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