Mexico's President-Elect Seeks to Reassure U.S

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

Mexico's President-Elect Seeks to Reassure U.S


Byline: Washington Post

MEXICO CITY -- The newly elected president of Mexico, Enrique Pena Nieto, is a mostly unknown figure in Washington, but he is moving aggressively to assure his northern neighbor he will fight hard against Mexico's drug lords and pursue warm relations with its top trading partner.

The outreach is necessary because Pena Nieto is an enigma to many in the U.S., as even his closest aides concede. As a comfortable front-runner during the presidential campaign, he kept his policy pronouncements vague, and as a former governor, he has no track record in foreign policy.

Pena Nieto, who won the election Sunday, will face immediate scrutiny as he begins to select his cabinet, especially his law enforcement and military ministers, who will inherit a brutal, complex war against wealthy paramilitary crime groups that have terrorized Mexico for six years and left 60,000 dead.

A top Pena Nieto campaign official said in a statement Monday, "Some may wonder what a Pena Nieto presidency will mean. The answer is simple. It will mean a stabilization of the situation in Mexico and advancement on many of the issues Americans care about."

Pena Nieto, who assumes office Dec. 1, orchestrated a remarkable political comeback of his Institutional Revolution Party (PRI), which ran Mexico for more than 70 years until its defeat in 2000. But he knows many people remain skeptical the PRI has transformed itself from its autocratic version.

His party has a reputation for cutting deals with drug cartels and allowing narcotics to move north, as long as crime mafias avoided public violence and attacks against civilians. Three of the last PRI governors in the bloodied border state of Tamaulipas are under investigation for allegedly aiding cartels.

"There is no going back to the past," Pena Nieto assured his audience here and aboard in a victory speech Sunday.

The U.S. and Mexico have a lot more than cocaine kingpins on their agenda. As top trading partners, the economies of the two countries are deeply integrated. Mexico is a top producer of the automobiles, flat-screen TVs and winter vegetables consumed in the U.S. More than $1 billion in goods cross the border daily. There are 33 million persons of Mexican descent in the U.S., including 6 million illegal immigrants.

Although he is the first Mexican president in 30 years who did not attend an elite U.S. university, Pena Nieto hasn't waited for introductions.

Speaking on national television Monday, Pena Nieto said he had received congratulatory phone calls from President Obama and other world leaders.

Obama shared "an interest in seeing the relationship between our countries expand," Pena Nieto said, adding that the American president told him that the United States considers the relationship with Mexico "one of most important in the world. …

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