Twenty Years of Tampering: Twenty Years after the UN's Earth Summit, Which Aimed to Put Every Human Action under UN Control, They're Still at It

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, June 4, 2012 | Go to article overview

Twenty Years of Tampering: Twenty Years after the UN's Earth Summit, Which Aimed to Put Every Human Action under UN Control, They're Still at It


Jasper, William F., The New American


Twenty years. Hard to believe that two decades have already passed since that global convergence known as the Earth Summit, or Eco '92, took place in Rio de Janeiro. In June of 1992, your correspondent made the trek to Brazil, the only conservative/constitutionalist journalist amongst the thousands of media representatives who joined some 20-thousand-plus diplomats, UN bureaucrats, academics, government officials, and environmental activists who swarmed to what was officially named the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). In addition to reporting on the conference for THE NEW AMERICAN magazine, I provided daily radio commentary and reports for the USA Radio Network news program (carried worldwide over the U.S. Armed Forces Network) and "Point of View With Marlin Maddoux and Kerby Anderson," a public affairs radio program carried nationally on Christian and secular radio stations.

The summit, a two-week affair running from June 3-14, boasted the participation of 172 national government delegations, including 108 heads of state. It also witnessed the coming of age of the UN lobbying force known as the NGO (non-governmental organization) movement, which is more than a bit of a misnomer, since many of the most influential NGOs are funded by national governments (as well as by the European Union, the UN, and UN Agencies), and NGO personnel regularly rotate in and out of "government service" or "international civil service." The NGO Forum, which was given a parallel venue at Rio, provided an ongoing "Woodstock" encampment of eco-propagandists whom the international media could (and did) present to the world as the voices of "global civil society" demanding action from the United Nations and national politicians to save us from environmental "crises" that were, ostensibly, imminent and planet-threatening.

The actions that came out of the summit were heralded by some as major transformative breakthroughs and, at the same time, denounced as too little and too timid by others who had hoped for even more empowerment for the United Nations. The documents that resulted from UNCED were Agenda 21, the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, the Statement of Forest Principles, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity.

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These agreements have spawned a vast, global bureaucracy and thousands of regulatory programs at the national, state, and local levels. The Convention on Climate Change has resulted in hundreds of billions of dollars wasted and misdirected in efforts to regulate harmless carbon dioxide (which is essential for plant life), cripple and destroy fossilfuel industries, and boost alternative "green" energy development. Under Agenda 21, our planet is being enmeshed with global-to-local regulations, like Gulliver entrapped by thousands of Lilliputian threads.

American Animosity

Recalling the atmosphere in which the Rio Earth Summit took place helps to provide some very important context. On June 2, 1992, the day before the opening of UNCED, James Brooke reported in the New York Times that "the mood in Brazil is that the United States will be the biggest villain of the conference," for refusing to sign on to the biodiversity convention and for weakening the climate-change accord. Brooke quoted Brazilian politician Fabio Feldman as saying that "all civil society and the press [arel against the U.S." This writer rarely agrees with the New York Times about anything, but this time Brooke had it right; the sentiment among the thousands of summit officials, activists, and journalists was virulently, pathologically anti-American--from top to bottom.

Maurice Strong, who served as UNCED's Secretary-General in Rio, helped set the tone in the months leading up to the summit, with a series of vitriolic, anti-American diatribes, accusing the United States and middle-class consumption patterns with destroying the planet.

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