Trial by Fury: Drone Attacks Go against Every Human Rights Principle in the Book

By Robertson, Geoffrey | New Statesman (1996), June 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Trial by Fury: Drone Attacks Go against Every Human Rights Principle in the Book


Robertson, Geoffrey, New Statesman (1996)


It has for centuries been lawful to kill enemy commanders, on the principle that "a man who is dead renews no war", a thought that comforted Cromwell as he viewed the body of Charles I. The outcry in the 1970s over comical CIA plots to murder Fidel Castro by sending him exploding cigars and poison pens led Congress to ban political assassinations under Executive Order 12333: "No person employed by or acting on behalf of the United States government shall engage in, or conspire to engage in, assassination." This comports with the Fifth Amendment to the US constitution, which protects "any person" (not just US citizens) from being "deprived of life ... without due process of law".

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Until 9/11, the legal position was clear: in war, active combatants could kill and be killed, subject to rules governing surrender, use of banned weapons, etc. But "war law" applied only to conflicts between armed forces of opposing states, invoking the right of self-defence. Confrontations with insurgents, rioters and terrorists were governed by human rights law, which requires state use of force against serious criminals to be reasonable in the circumstances. This is more restrictive - after three IRA bombers were shot dead on Gibraltar in 1988, the European Court held that the UK had denied them the right to life because MI5 had jumped to mistaken conclusions. In the case of known members of terrorist organisations, the "reasonable force" requirement exercises a necessary and humane restraint over the trigger-happiness of "special forces" and drone targeters. This is why the US, Russia and Israel pretend they are bound only by the law of war, which allows suspects to be killed without much compunction.

The states that deploy drones argue that they are operating under war law, where human rights are less relevant. As Harold Koh, legal adviser to the US state department, puts it: "The US is in an armed conflict with al-Qaeda ... and may use force consistent with its inherent right to self-defence ... including by targeting persons such as high-level al-Qaeda leaders who are planning to attack us." This bald statement prompts many questions. How can you have "an armed conflict" without an enemy state? What criteria are used for putting names on the secret death list: is it enough to be sympathetic to terrorism, married to a terrorist, or anti-American? To provide shelter or give funds to terrorist groups? What is the required degree of proof? There are no accountability mechanisms no inquests, sometimes not even a casualty list (although the US usually announces and celebrates when it hits a "high-value target").

In drone warfare, there is no fairness or due process to enable the potential victim, his relatives or any outside body to challenge the accuracy of the information on which the targeting decision has been made. The Senate foreign relations committee reported in 2009 that the Pentagon's approved list of "prioritised targets" contained 367 names and had been expanded to include so Afghan drug lords suspected of donating money to the Taliban. Suppose the suspicion was unreasonable, or the donation had been at gunpoint, or of a negligible amount? What the Pentagon is doing is secretly sentencing people to death for an unproven crime.

The Israeli Supreme Court is the only tribunal to have confronted the legality of targeted killing, at a time (2008) when 234 victims had been members of Hamas and a further 153 had been civilians who got in the way. The court contented itself with comments about limiting the targets to dangerous terrorists and issued Polonius-like precautionary precepts: "well-based information is needed"; "innocent civilians are not to be harmed"; "careful verification is needed before an attack is made". In reality, innocent civilians very often are killed, and "verification" always seems careful to the minds of the targeters.

Israeli officials seem morally content to risk civilian lives: after a one-tonne bomb was dropped on Gaza City in 2002, killing many civilians in order to assassinate the Hamas military leader Salah Shehadeh, an inquiry merely noted "shortcomings" in evaluation of information.

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