"Price Tag": West Bank Settlers' Terrorizing of Palestinians to Deter Israeli Government Law Enforcement

By Nir, Ori | Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law, Spring-Fall 2011 | Go to article overview

"Price Tag": West Bank Settlers' Terrorizing of Palestinians to Deter Israeli Government Law Enforcement


Nir, Ori, Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law


I.   PREFACE AND SUMMARY II.  INCEPTION OF PRICE TAG III. THE EVOLUTION OF PRICE TAG: FROM UNPOPULAR      ANTI-GOVERNMENT HIGH-PROFILE RESISTANCE TO POPULAR      ANTI-PALESTINIAN LOW-INTENSITY TERRORISM IV.  CONCLUSION 

I. PREFACE AND SUMMARY

"Price Tag," also known as "Arvut Hadadit" (Mutual Responsibility), is a set of violent tactics employed by national-religious Israeli settlers in the West Bank to deter Israeli law enforcement authorities from removing illegally-built structures from West Bank settlements. (1) The tactics employed include attacks on Palestinians and their property, as well as attacks on Israeli military and police officers. These tactics are designed to obstruct and deter law enforcement inside settlements, but their ultimate goal is to deter Israeli leaders from implementing a possible future Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement that entails removing Israeli settlements from the West Bank.

This essay describes how a strategy that started as a reaction to a sense of powerlessness and ineptness morphed from an unpopular form of high-profile, anti-government resistance into a popular--and very effective--low-intensity anti-Palestinian terrorism campaign.

By tweaking their tactics and using them in a determined yet controlled manner, its perpetrators--young militant national-religious Jewish settlers in the West Bank--have been successful in achieving two major objectives: first, they have deterred Israeli authorities from enforcing the law and demolishing illegally-constructed buildings in West Bank settlements; second, they have done so without alienating an overwhelming majority of Israelis.

This essay documents the success of a form of terrorism unique in Western experience: politically-motivated violence directed against a foe, with the primary purpose of deterring the terrorists' own government from taking actions against their community.

II. INCEPTION OF PRICE TAG

The adoption of the "Price Tag" policy by settlers is rooted in a trauma experienced by the settler movement in 2005: Israel's August 2005 withdrawal from the Gaza Strip and from four northern West Bank settlements. (2) Before explaining the significance of that trauma, some background is necessary to understand who the players are and the political context in which they have acted.

The West Bank and the Gaza Strip came under Israeli military occupation in 1967, following the Six Day War. (3) The West Bank is today home to some 2.5 million Palestinians and 305,000 Israeli settlers. (4) The settlers live in 121 officially recognized settlements (not including East Jerusalem). (5) These settlements are officially recognized, in the sense that they were constructed with Israeli government authorization. Most of the world's governments regard all Jewish settlements in the occupied territories as illegal. (6) In addition to these "recognized" settlements, some settlers live in about one hundred illegal (under Israeli law) "outposts." (7) These are small communities built without Israeli government approval.

The Gaza Strip is home to over 1,650,000 Palestinians. (8) Until 2005, there were also 8,600 Israeli settlers living in twenty-one settlements in the Gaza Strip. (9) In September 2005, then-Prime Minister Ariel Sharon led a sweeping, historical campaign to unilaterally "disengage" from the Gaza Strip. (10) He withdrew all of the Israeli settlers and all of Israel's military installations from the Strip. In addition, the Sharon government removed four small settlements in the northern West Bank. Today, Sharon is remembered as the Israeli leader who once (in the 1980s and 1990s) was the chief sponsor and advocate of the settlement enterprise, and then later became the first Israeli leader to start its dismantlement.

In 2003, Israel accepted the U.S.-sponsored "Road Map" plan to restart Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations. The plan stipulated that all Israeli illegal outposts that were constructed after 2001 would be promptly dismantled. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

"Price Tag": West Bank Settlers' Terrorizing of Palestinians to Deter Israeli Government Law Enforcement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.