Syrian Regime Losing on the Media Front, Too; Blames Unrest on 'Terrorists'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

Syrian Regime Losing on the Media Front, Too; Blames Unrest on 'Terrorists'


Byline: Andrew Bossone, Special to The Washington Times

BEIRUT -- From the beginning of the Syrian uprising, the battle has been one of words as well as weapons and, as rebels strike ever closer to the heart of the regime, the state propaganda machine also appears under threat.

The state-run news agency SANA reported Sunday that the Ministry of Information was accusing Western intelligence services of planning to hijack Syrian satellite channels to broadcast false news. Meanwhile, SANA cast fighters attacking the capital of Damascus and commercial hub of Aleppo as terrorist insurgents.

Analysts dismissed both reports as typical of the regime's casting of the popular uprising as the work of foreign terrorists. While the regime tries to downplay gains made by the Free Syrian Army, the defection of TV host Ola Abbas certainly will not go unnoticed by the Syrian public.

[The regime] fears that a host or anchor would defect more than someone in the military because [that would mean] a year ago the host said one thing, and now they're saying something different, she said. Everyone knows the state media is lying and remembers the faces of hosts.

Speaking in Beirut before leaving for France, Ms. Abbas said in her first interview with foreign media that several security branches oversee the Syrian media and that instructions are dictated from regime officials by phone to managers who execute their orders.

Never say the word, 'protest'; say 'gathering,' said Ms. Abbas, describing the rules that governed any reports on the uprising. Never say 'revolution.' Ever. Say, 'crisis.'

During the 17-month-old uprising, the regime has consistently tried to downplay the scale and violence of the revolt through its media, broadcasting purportedly live images of calm, empty streets even as citizen-generated video from the same locations showed huge protests.

After three attacks on government buildings this year, the state media were quick to report the news in order to tell the regime's version of the story, in each case blaming Islamist terrorists.

The most recent attack, which killed five top regime officials last week, was labeled a suicide bombing. Blaming Islamist terrorists instead of rebels showed that the regime has become more sophisticated in its propaganda during the uprising, said Syrian media critic Keenan Ali, who declined to use his real name out of fear of retaliation.

In the past, they would just ignore anything that was said about the Syrian regime, said Mr. Ali. Now they are willing to take some other coverage if they think they can make a more convincing story.

Syria warns of 'false news'

On Sunday, Syria accused the West of planning to hijack the country's satellite television channels to broadcast disinformation about an alleged coup or defections.

An Information Ministry source warned that Western intelligence are planning, in cooperation with some Arab parties, to hijack the frequencies of Syrian satellite channels, SANA reported.

It said the aim would be to broadcast false news on an alleged coup d'etat or ... military defections or the fall of certain cities. …

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Syrian Regime Losing on the Media Front, Too; Blames Unrest on 'Terrorists'
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