Ending the Sentence of Unemployed for Life; Prudent Finances and Faith-Based Aid Can Help the Jobless Recover

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

Ending the Sentence of Unemployed for Life; Prudent Finances and Faith-Based Aid Can Help the Jobless Recover


Byline: Chuck Bentley , SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The simple pleasures of summer have been overshadowed this year by crushing institutional despair as too many Americans are sentenced to life without meaningful employment.

The monthly job reports have taken on the tone of a parole board hearing in which the dismal fates of millions are laid out in bleak numbers. The stagnant unemployment number of 8.2 percent ignores those sentenced so long to joblessness that they have become unemployment lifers. Also ignored is the fact that not enough jobs are being created to accommodate new workers, those fresh-faced graduates ready to take their place in the world. With the Federal Reserve predicting no real change until 2014, if then, the data bear a closer look.

The Hill newspaper reports that until recently, the highest percentage of long-term unemployed workers was 26 percent in the 1980s. Compare that to a peak of 46 percent during the most recent downturn, and currently about 43 percent, according to the latest Labor Department figures.

Further breaking down the numbers, of 12.7 million unemployed, 5.4 million have been out of work for at least six months. Of those, about 33 percent have suffered without work for a year or longer. That stands in stark contrast to data from before the beginning of the recession, in December 2007, when just 17.5 percent of the unemployed were out of work for six months or longer.

Bearing the brunt of this is the next generation. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development warned recently that 14.8 percent of young people ages 15 to 24 in the United States are neither employed nor in school or training programs.

Ironically, the story of struggling young people can be told easily by considering America's returning veterans. While the national unemployment rate is 8.2 percent, it is nearly 13 percent for returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan, the Daily Caller reported.

Hope and change do not seem to be on the horizon, given current economic policies. Most economists are predicting that the job market will continue on this track for an unhealthy seven years following the end of the Great Recession, which, we are told, ended in June 2009. That seems a claim worthy of dispute. It will be the longest stretch of high unemployment since the end of World War II.

Inexplicably, the Obama administration asserts that Americans should not read too much into the terrible numbers. Such thin gruel of comfort has been offered to unemployed Americans more than 30 times during 41 straight months of unemployment over 8 percent - and counting. It seems very callous for those protected by the security of federal jobs and pensions to discount the very real concerns of millions left with nothing.

A new approach is needed - one that ends the pretense that the federal government can spend its way to achieving full employment without bankrupting the few remaining wage earners available, one that makes government a partner with job creators rather than treating them as a suspect class. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ending the Sentence of Unemployed for Life; Prudent Finances and Faith-Based Aid Can Help the Jobless Recover
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.