Greater Insight Essays 2012: Roger Sant, Maritz Research Europe - Warning: There Really Is No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

Marketing, July 25, 2012 | Go to article overview
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Greater Insight Essays 2012: Roger Sant, Maritz Research Europe - Warning: There Really Is No Such Thing as a Free Lunch


Surveys and social-media intelligence both have strengths, but combining them yields the best data.

We are all tempted by the lure of a virtually limitless and relatively inexpensive source of unfettered customer feedback, but should we be suspicious of what looks very much like a free lunch? There are clear advantages to using social-media intelligence (SMI) to gain insights, but we also need to be aware of the compromises that this brings.

Comparing survey research with social-media intelligence

To look at this issue, Maritz conducted a parallel study comparing questions asked on a review website with exactly the same questions asked in a representative sample survey in the same industry. Although there were some expected similarities, there were also significant differences. The conclusions that we would reach from the two sources of information are not the same.

The study also uncovered representation issues. Of the 1500 people who had been surveyed about their experiences, only 13% had posted anything about the experiences online during the past year.

Clearly there are many advantages of survey data over SMI. We have shown that web content can come from only a very small part of our target market. Surveys allow us to gather information relating to the specific issues we need to address. We can control the spread and robustness of customer feedback, enabling us to give scores to units (such as bank branches or automotive dealerships) and incentivise them accordingly Finally, survey data is independent, whereas social-media content can be biased by what has been posted beforehand.

There are, however, some significant advantages of social media over surveys. SMI provides the ability to identify emerging trends - the 'unknown unknowns' that can give us an early warning of what is to come It enables a deep dive to almost any level, explaining the underlying root causes of issues that emerge; it is rich in emotional expression, providing an understanding of the depth of feeling associated with content; and it provides a competitive perspective - is it just my brand or an industry issue?

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