Manaf Tlass

By Dickey, Christopher; Giglio, Mike | Newsweek, August 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

Manaf Tlass


Dickey, Christopher, Giglio, Mike, Newsweek


Byline: Christopher Dickey and Mike Giglio

A Syrian exile waits in the shadows.

Until a few weeks ago, Manaf Tlass was known more for whom he knew than what he was. Few people saw in the playboy son of a former defense minister, buddy of President Bashar al-Assad, and brother of a famed Paris hostess a potential Syrian leader. Yet Tlass has recently been anointed in the media as his country's great tousled hope--a development that reveals much about the desperation of those trying to contain the widening civil war, even as they step up covert efforts to overthrow the regime.

Since the start of the uprising last year, regional and Western powers have been searching for an insider not too tainted by his association with the regime but still able to restore order post-Assad by preserving the security apparatus.

On the face of it, Tlass seems to qualify. The 48-year-old, who grew up with Assad, is a brigadier general who defected last month. Beyond that, Tlass belongs to the Sunni majority and has connections in the West through his sister. But Syrians, especially the rebels, express distrust of Tlass.

"We believe he's the hidden shadow of Bashar al-Assad," says one high-ranking Syrian military officer who's taken up arms against the regime. More damning, perhaps, is the verdict from a prominent member of the Syrian National Council, a largely civilian exile group: "He's not a big brain."

Certainly, how exactly Tlass intends to guide Syria from war to a new democratic future--as he says he wants to--is unclear. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Manaf Tlass
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.