Oval Office Interview with President Obama

By Dingle, Derek T. | Black Enterprise, August 2012 | Go to article overview

Oval Office Interview with President Obama


Dingle, Derek T., Black Enterprise


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In three months voters will head to the polls to decide whether to give President Obama a second term. This election will communicate whether the electorate believes his continued occupancy of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. will fulfill his promise of sustained economic growth and shared prosperity. I BLACK ENTERPRISE recently gained the opportunity to interview him for the first time in the Oval Office. In a 20-minute Q&A session with BE Editor in Chief Derek T. Dingle, he talked about his support of black business, policies to advance small companies, and completing his ambitious agenda.

As you campaign for re-election, what do you communicate to black businesses that will make them enthusiastic supporters?

The first thing is to understand that we have just gone through the worst financial and economic crisis in our lifetimes. And my first job as president was to make sure that we didn't slip into a second Great Depression. We were losing 800,000 jobs a month. Banks were locked up. Credit was frozen. The auto industry was about to go under. And because of the steps that we took, we have now seen two straight years of job growth, 4 million jobs created, [the] strongest manufacturing growth since the 1990s, unemployment has started to come down, and the auto industry is back. All of those steps that we took had an impact on black businesses just like they did businesses generally.

Let's take the auto industry. You know the number of black businesses that are involved in the supply chain and that are involved in various services, whether it's advertising or other aspects of the industry. They have all been impacted positively by the steps that we took. Now does that mean that we've done enough? Absolutely not.

The African American community ends up being hurt during recessionary times more than the population at large. [The] African American unemployment rate is still way too high. You had a credit crunch for small-and medium-sized businesses that disproportionately impacted African American businesses. But part of what we have been able to do is to specifically focus on disadvantaged businesses, disadvantaged communities. The Small Business Administration, for example, which is a significant source of financing for minority-and women-owned businesses, has stepped into the breach by expanding their loan portfolios and cutting their fees at a time when a lot of banks and other financial institutions just pulled back. Some of the work that we did legislatively, like the New Markets Tax Credit, makes a huge difference specifically for African American businesses.

How do you respond to criticism that your administration hasn't done enough to support black businesses?

My general view has been consistent throughout, which is that I want all businesses to succeed. I want all Americans to have opportunity. I'm not the president of black America. I'm the president of the United States of America, but the programs that we have put in place have been directed at those folks who are least able to get financing through conventional means, who have been in the past locked out of opportunities that were available to everybody. So, I'll put my track record up against anybody in terms of us putting in place broad based programs that ultimately had a huge benefit for African American businesses.

The resurrected financial services industry hasn't stepped up in terms of providing adequate capital to small- and minority-owned businesses.

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