(Bishop Gordon) Beardy Backs Mi'kmaq Fishers: Bishop Visits Burnt Church

By Blair, Kathy | Anglican Journal, November 2000 | Go to article overview

(Bishop Gordon) Beardy Backs Mi'kmaq Fishers: Bishop Visits Burnt Church


Blair, Kathy, Anglican Journal


Bishop Gordon Beardy of Keewatin visited Burnt Church, N.B., in late September to lend his support to Mi'kmaq who were engaged in a bitter dispute with the federal government and non-Native fishers over lobsters.

"We as a diocese have a major commitment to healing and reconciliation," said Bishop Beardy's executive archdeacon, David Ashdown, in explaining why the bishop went. Bishop Beardy was not available for comment.

"I think part of that includes the recognition and support of treaty rights," Archdeacon Ashdown said. "You're not going to have healing unless you have justice.

"Because we have that kind of commitment, he (Bishop Beardy) thought this was an important issue, almost symbolic of the struggle going on right across the country. We don't have a lot of lobsters here in northwestern Ontario and northeastern Manitoba but we do have fishing and game questions. We have trees and lumber issues, which are affected by this so we have a pretty keen interest in what's going on there."

The Mi'kmaq have asserted their treaty rights to catch lobster out of season. Non-Native fishers in the area demanded that many of the lobster traps be removed and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans were forcibly doing so.

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