Much of Value for Canadians in Teaching Series (the New Church's Teaching Series of Episcopal Church in the U.S.)

By Bays, Patricia | Anglican Journal, February 2000 | Go to article overview

Much of Value for Canadians in Teaching Series (the New Church's Teaching Series of Episcopal Church in the U.S.)


Bays, Patricia, Anglican Journal


IN THE 1950s and again in the 1970s, the Episcopal (Anglican) Church in the U.S.A. commissioned two series of books to explore and teach the Christian faith. Now, a third, The New Church's Teaching Series, is being produced. The first four volumes were published jointly by the Anglican Book Centre and Cowley Publications. The remaining ones are published by Cowley alone.

The Practice of Prayer, by Margaret Guenther, is a down-to-earth guide to personal and common prayer. An Episcopal priest and spiritual director, Guenther draws on the riches of Christian spiritual writings as well as on her own experience of prayer. She speaks frankly of the difficulties and discouragement we encounter and suggests many practical ways in which we might grow in the life of prayer. Her topics include a good introduction to the different kinds of prayer (petition, intercession and so on) to classical models of prayer (Ignatian, Lectio Divina, and the Jesus Prayer), to helpful practices like retreats and journalling.

Part Two speaks of the challenge of praying "in the midst of life" -- finding God in the ordinary, prayer and parenting, learning simplicity, prayer through desolation, and praying in community. There is a detailed resource list of books both classic and contemporary. This is an excellent exploration of the nature of prayer, both as an introduction for those who are beginning to discover the way of prayer, and a rich resource for those farther along this path. It is clearly written and full of helpful examples and suggestions.

Living With History, by Fredrica Harris Thompsett, is a fascinating book, not of the details of history but of how we interpret and use it, how we remember past events in order to deal with present questions. Thompsett reminds us tradition is not static but dynamic and changing.

She chooses to explore as touchstones 10 achievements in the history of the church, ranging from the development of theological concepts such as covenant and incarnation to structural changes like the full inclusion of laity and of women in the life of the church. She looks at the importance of biography, at the lives of some 20th-century lay people, as a way' of understanding history and exploring our changing understanding of ministry.

She looks at three ways in which Anglicans have handled conflict: compromise (the Elizabethan Settlement), ignoring conflict (the church's role in the U.S. Civil War), and welcoming conflict (the dialogue with the "new science" in the 19th and 20th centuries).

Thompsett speaks of "recycling" tradition -- how can lessons of history help us to deal with today's new issues? -- and uses such diverse examples as the Bible, Richard Hooker, and the Caroline Divines to provide useful insights on today's ecological questions.

She concludes with seven helpful guidelines for discussing controversial matters, seeing Anglicanism as "a dialogue that searches faithfully for comprehensive understanding."

I think this is an excellent book -- clear, easy to read, thoughtful, suggesting ways in which history might help us to live responsibly now and in the future.

Early Christian Traditions. In the first chapter, Rebecca Lyman describes discovering the early church in a college class. "I fell in love with its questions, heroism, and passion for God," she says.

This book is a clear exploration of the people and ideas of the time, the heresies and doctrines. It shows how the traditions of the church developed from the simple proclamation of Jesus's life, death, and resurrection to the complex understanding of the nature of God the Trinity that we find in the historic creeds.

The introductory chapter shows how the tradition fits into the development of Anglican theology. As we struggle today to define Anglican identity in a time of theological diversity, Lyman reminds us that diversity was part of the apostolic church, and shows how the tradition of the church can be a model for unity in diversity.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Much of Value for Canadians in Teaching Series (the New Church's Teaching Series of Episcopal Church in the U.S.)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.