Readers Blast Political Advertising

The Florida Times Union, August 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Readers Blast Political Advertising


What do voters think of the nasty, negative advertising this campaign season?

As the Times-Union reported, the Aaron Bean-Mike Weinstein primary race for a state Senate seat was especially costly and mean-spirited.

So we checked in with our group of independent voters in the Email Interactive Group.

Even independents aren't monolithic. About two-thirds of them are reliable Republican or Democratic voters. Only about 1 in 8 are "deliberators," quintessential swing voters.

But they all want more cross-party cooperation, according to a new study by The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation.

UNBELIEVABLE SPENDING

It seems staggering that $4.5 million can be spent on a single state Senate seat nomination.

This is either the result of passionate supporters pouring their dollars into the campaigns due to the charged climate, or it's the notion that the perks, power and influence (even at the state Senate level) are ultimately worth it to those running for office.

My general reaction is just a shrug. This is an ancient problem.

I have little doubt that somewhere in Athens when democracy began, two candidates bit down on the same bone and refused to let go.

Steve Ducharme, Isle of Palms

HERE'S A BETTER IDEA

I'd like to see less money spent on advertising and the difference used for charity.

Wendy Honigman, Jacksonville

FOCUS ON THE POSITIVE

Why do the candidates always tell us how bad the other person is? Why do they not tell us how good they are? They should state this is what I have done good and that's why I should be the one to be elected, or is it because they are both bad, but the other person is worse?

Marc Lang, Jacksonville

VOTERS WILL DECIDE

The Bean-Weinstein race was an intra-party conflict and what appeared to be a bare knuckles fight to control a future Florida Senate. So the contest suggests that the Republicans cannot even fight fairly among themselves, much less in a general election.

If the Republicans cannot control their greed for power, it is up to the voters to do it for them and choose alternatives for office. However, I won't hold my breath waiting.

Jim Crooks, Jacksonville

DISCLOSURE IS KEY

Perhaps we should consider a requirement that all "front" organizations be required to publish and broadcast a list of their major donors.

It could be that donors will either refuse to have their names associated with malicious ads or begin insisting these ads are at least truthful.

Dan Dundon, Jacksonville

JUST IGNORE THEM

Some of the radio ads were so bad that I turned the radio off when they were on.

B.

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