Mythology in Art

By Carroll, Colleen | Arts & Activities, September 2012 | Go to article overview

Mythology in Art


Carroll, Colleen, Arts & Activities


The art of Aboriginal Australia reaches back over 30,000 years. These ancient peoples depicted their world through iconography that included dots, geometric shapes, hand and foot prints, and renderings of plant and animal forms. Tribal artists mainly used ochre to create pigment; rock, bark, sand and the human body were their "canvases."

Many contemporary Australian Aboriginal artists, such as the painter of this month's Clip & Save Art Print, work within this traditional symbology, connecting their lives and art to the ancient belief referred to as Dreaming or Dreamtime.

"The Aborigines learned about the origins of the tribe through their Dreamtime creation myths, that told of the significant actions of the creators. [They] believed that the land they occupied was once vacuous--empty," writes Geoff Moore on www.aboriginalartonline.com.

"Then, during what has become known as the Dreamtime, the land, sky above, and all they contained were formed by the actions of supernatural and mysterious beings."

One of the most important beings in Dreamtime creation stories is the Rainbow Serpent. It is told that before the beginning of life a giant serpent lived beneath the earth's surface. Slowly, she travelled toward the surface until she emerged into the light. She travelled the earth, leaving deep tracks in the land.

When she tired, she curled up her enormous body and slept. When she returned to the place where she began, she summoned the frogs to the surface. She tickled their bellies, causing them to release the water they had been storing. This water filled the tracks and holes, forming the land's lakes and rivers. From the water sprang all plants, trees and animals, and thus the Rainbow Serpent is also call the Mother of Life.

In this month's Art Print, the artist depicts two Rainbow Snakes, possibly representing the female, Yingarna, who is the original creator, and the male, Ngalyod, who is believed to be the transformer of the land. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mythology in Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.