Anglican Communion Must Be Distinct from Church of England: (Njongonkulu) Ndungane

By McAteer, Michael | Anglican Journal, October 1999 | Go to article overview

Anglican Communion Must Be Distinct from Church of England: (Njongonkulu) Ndungane


McAteer, Michael, Anglican Journal


Archbishop Njongonkulu Ndungane of Cape Town speaks from the heart when he calls for a strengthening of Anglican Communion bonds to offset fallout from last year's Lambeth Conference.

"I feel very passionately about the Anglican Communion," the archbishop told the Journal in an interview. "There is something unique about it and we should not allow the elements of divisiveness that seem to be growing following Lambeth to get between us."

Archbishop Ndungane, who comes from a long line of Anglican clergy, was elected archbishop of Cape Town in 1996 and became primate of the Church of the Province of South Africa. He succeeded Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

A strong African voice in the Anglican Communion, the 58-year-old archbishop has called for the merger of Africa's 11 autonomous Anglican churches into an Episcopal Church of Africa. With 31.5 million members, and growing, a single African Church would be the largest in the Anglican Communion: "a mighty church with a strong voice."

Archbishop Ndungane says his deep commitment to the communion played a part in him being invited to address a conference called Local Communities, Global Realities held in June at the University of Toronto's Trinity College.

"I take my presence here (at the conference) as a visual aid to show there is a world out there other than Toronto or Canada," he told the Journal. "That we are all bound together by our bonds of affection."

If these bonds are to be strengthened some changes are necessary. For a start, the Church of England needs to be "liberated" from the notion that it is the Anglican Communion, the archbishop said.

"What I am arguing for is that we need to devise a system whereby the Anglican Communion is something distinctive from the Church of England," he said. "There is a kind of belief, even amongst members of the Church of England, that it is the Anglican Communion. The media in England also tends to think that way."

By virtue of his office, the Archbishop of Canterbury heads both the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion. While "the historic see of Canterbury should continue to have a symbolic titular role," Archbishop Ndungane says it is time for the communion's right to elect its own head. …

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