TB Is Rare in Wales, but We Still See 200 Cases a Year; While Much Research and Expertise Is Focused on Major Conditions Such as Cancer, Heart Disease and Stroke, Have Infectious Diseases Been Left Behind? Lorna Bennett, of Public Health Wales, Looks at How Much of a Threat Tuberculosis and Hepatitis Pose to Today's Population

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 10, 2012 | Go to article overview

TB Is Rare in Wales, but We Still See 200 Cases a Year; While Much Research and Expertise Is Focused on Major Conditions Such as Cancer, Heart Disease and Stroke, Have Infectious Diseases Been Left Behind? Lorna Bennett, of Public Health Wales, Looks at How Much of a Threat Tuberculosis and Hepatitis Pose to Today's Population


TUBERCULOSIS - or TB - kills more people across the world than any other infectious disease. A particular problem in resource poor countries, TB is thought to cause around two million deaths globally every year.

The World Health Organisation reports that about one-third of the world's population is infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacteria. Only a small proportion of those infected will become sick with TB. About 80% of the reported TB cases in 2010 occurred in only 22 countries.

In Wales, TB is fortunately less of a problem. As living conditions and diet have improved over the last 100 years, TB, which is often associated with poor and overcrowded housing, has declined.

However, TB has never completely disappeared in Wales and Public Health Wales is still notified of around 200 new cases each year.

Often, these cases will be in people who have links to countries where TB is a larger problem.

There has been some publicity and panic around the recent emergence of new strains of TB, which are resistant to antibiotics and cannot be treated.

Cases of such infection remain very rare in the UK and only account for around 1% of newly diagnosed cases.

Dr Lika Nehaul, consultant in communicable disease control for Public Health Wales, said: "There are a lot of misconceptions about TB that mean people in Wales can become very frightened of it.

"People think it is now an extremely rare disease that is very contagious and only ever occurs in Wales if someone from abroad has brought it with them. They also often think that TB can no longer be treated and will prove fatal.

"In fact, we still see around 200 cases of TB in people resident in Wales each year, but it remains difficult to catch and easy to treat.

"In the vast majority of cases, a course of antibiotics taken for six months is enough for patients to make a full recovery.

"If someone has TB, we will want to investigate the people they live with or work closely with, as it is usually caught from people living in the same household, or a close social contact."

TB usually affects the lungs and causes a cough, fever, weight loss and sometimes blood-stained phlegm.

The effective control of tuberculosis depends on early detection of cases (especially infectious TB of the lung) and prompt treatment.

The TB vaccine (BCG) does not prevent infection, and therefore does not help in controlling the spread of TB. Its use is now recommended in the UK for people, especially young children, who are most at risk of exposure to TB in other people, particularly within their family.

All cases of TB diagnosed in Wales are notified to Public Health Wales, who work with clinical TB teams to ensure that anyone who has come into close contact with patients is traced, investigated and treated.

Although anyone can catch TB, it is more common in people who live in poor housing, are dependent on drugs and alcohol, have a chronic health condition or have a poor immune system due to treatment for an illness such as cancer or HIV.

The number of people with hepatitis B or C infection can be considered relatively low in Wales compared to other parts of the world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

TB Is Rare in Wales, but We Still See 200 Cases a Year; While Much Research and Expertise Is Focused on Major Conditions Such as Cancer, Heart Disease and Stroke, Have Infectious Diseases Been Left Behind? Lorna Bennett, of Public Health Wales, Looks at How Much of a Threat Tuberculosis and Hepatitis Pose to Today's Population
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.