Colour Me Happy; DIFFERENT COLOURS CAN HAVE AN EFFECT ON OUR MOODS AND BEHAVIOUR IN RATHER SURPRISING WAYS, REPORTS TANITH CAREY

The Mirror (London, England), September 13, 2012 | Go to article overview
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Colour Me Happy; DIFFERENT COLOURS CAN HAVE AN EFFECT ON OUR MOODS AND BEHAVIOUR IN RATHER SURPRISING WAYS, REPORTS TANITH CAREY


Byline: TANITH CAREY

Sexy billionaire Christian Grey may have his red room of pain in the saucy bestseller Fifty Shades of Grey.

But it turns out that purple is actually the sexiest colour you can paint your bedroom.

A new survey has found that people with a purple colour scheme in their boudoir have the most sex - clocking up 3.49 intimate encounters each week. And despite the title of the E L James blockbuster, those with grey bedrooms notch up a paltry 1.8 weekly romps, according to Littlewoods.com.

But it's not just our sex lives that are influenced by colour. So are our moods, our appetites and how well our brain works. Here's how different hues affect your body.

BLUE

If you want to lose weight, try painting your kitchen blue. One study found that diners who eat in a blue room, compared to one painted red or yellow, eat a third less calories.

"Most people are unaware of the profound effect colour has on their behaviour," says Kenneth Fehrman, co-author of Color: The Secret Influence. "For instance, blue is an appetite suppressant. In tests, many people could not bring themselves to eat foods coloured blue.

"We have deep-seated instincts to avoid blue foods, or anything linked to them, as they tend to be poisonous."

PINK

Katie Price and her fiance Leo might be interested to learn that if you and your partner row a lot, you might want e and her fiance Leo nterested to learn and your partner you might want to think about painting your walls pink.

Studies have found the girly hue has a calming effect on the body - and reduces muscle strength.

Dr Alexander Schauss, director of the American Institute for Biosocial and Medical Research in Washington, was the first to discover how the shade dampens down anger and anxiety in the late 70s.

Since then, many prisons in the US have painted cells this hue to keep inmates calm.

Dr Schauss explains: "Even if a person tries to be angry or aggressive in the presence of pink, he can't. The heart muscles can't race fast enough.

"It's a tranquillising colour that saps your energy."

Perhaps it's no surprise that women respond more positively to pink. In one study, researchers found they were more likely to vote for politicians if their names were written on pink ballot papers, rather than green ones. Men favoured the names on the green slips.

Both genders have also been found to be more likely to respond to surveys if they are printed on pink paper instead of white.

RED

Looking for love? Than it turns out that being a scarlet woman really could do the trick.

The colour red has been found to make men more attracted to the opposite sex, researchers at the University of Rochester, New York, found. Nearly 100 men were shown photographs of women in different coloured clothes and those in scarlet were rated as much more desirable - and the men said they would spend more cash on them on a date.

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Colour Me Happy; DIFFERENT COLOURS CAN HAVE AN EFFECT ON OUR MOODS AND BEHAVIOUR IN RATHER SURPRISING WAYS, REPORTS TANITH CAREY
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