The Party Left Him: Obama Helped Make Former Rep. Artur Davis a Republican

By Bloom, Jordan | The American Conservative, September 2012 | Go to article overview

The Party Left Him: Obama Helped Make Former Rep. Artur Davis a Republican


Bloom, Jordan, The American Conservative


Artur Davis, a former Democratic congressman from Alabama, was the first House member outside Illinois to endorse Barack Obama's presidential bid. Yet over the next several years he bucked his party on a number of high-profile votes and became the sole member of the Congressional Black Caucus to oppose the president's healthcare reform law in 2010. After losing a primary bid for governor in his home state, Davis reemerged in 2012 as a Virginia Republican, floating tantalizing though decidedly noncommittal hints that he might run for office again. TAC recently spoke to him:

TAC: The Republican Party's platform hasn't changed much since the Bush years, except with a bit more fiscal stringency thanks to the Tea Party. So did your views change, or did the Democratic Party simply become in-hospitable?

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Artur Davis: The Democratic Party became more insular, and I finally decided over the course of the last year and a half that the things the Democrats were saying weren't resonating with me and that the things that the Republicans were saying did. I'm certainly one of many Americans disappointed with the Obama presidency, one of many Americans who voted for promises that haven't been delivered on. So my switching parties may be of interest to people because I used to be an elected official, but it's frankly a fairly broad trend in parts of the country. And you'll definitely see that in Virginia. Barack Obama got about 53 percent of the vote in Virginia. Barack Obama is running about 46 right now. There are a lot of people who left the Democratic Party.

TAC: To what do you attribute the Democratic Party's failure to advance any credible plan for entitlement reform?

AD: The Medicare program constructed in 1965 was for a different country and a different population than the one it serves today, but essentially it's financed in the same manner. That's not sustainable. We can't sustain a system where Medicare is a universal program that is a God-given American right if you're a senior with a certain income level. If we want to preserve the safety net aspects of Medicare, which we absolutely need to, we're going to have to make changes to the program. We are going to have to give people a viable option out of Medicare, particularly when they're affluent and when they can afford it.

Social Security will not exist like it does today for people under 30. It absolutely won't. And if we don't make smart, prudent changes in the system, we will end up with a system that can't even meet basic safety net goals. And I think that's the risk the Democrats are incurring now--that by their loyalty to the present system for financing and sustaining Social Security and Medicare, they are contributing to an insolvency that will eventually undercut the safety net goals that were a core part of these programs.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Party Left Him: Obama Helped Make Former Rep. Artur Davis a Republican
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.