Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Australia in International Politics: An Introduction to Australian Foreign Policy (3Rd Edition)

By Butcher, Andrew | New Zealand International Review, September-October 2012 | Go to article overview

Australia in International Politics: An Introduction to Australian Foreign Policy (3Rd Edition)


Butcher, Andrew, New Zealand International Review


AUSTRALIA IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS: An Introduction to Australian Foreign Policy (3rd edition)

Author: Stewart Firth

Published by: Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, NSW, 2011, 356pp, A$55.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Stewart Firth, visiting fellow in the Melanesia programme at the Australian National University, has written a third edition of his book Australia in International Politics. The book is sweeping in its coverage. It is divided into four parts: the evolution of Australian foreign policy, security, economy and issues in foreign policy. The book charts Australian foreign policy from 1901 onwards, giving particular attention to foreign policy under prime ministers Hawke, Keating and Howard.

The preoccupations of these three prime ministers are then used to frame discussion on Australia's role in and attitude toward the United Nations, regional security, nuclear challenges, intervention and state building, globalisation and the global financial crisis, international trade, and the environment, foreign aid and human rights. Published in 2011, the book includes material relevant to Julia Gillard's early period as prime minister, though only in passing and, in turn, Kevin Rudd's period as foreign minister.

The book is clearly designed as a textbook, presumably for undergraduate students, with bullet point discussion questions beginning each chapter and 'assessments' and recommended reading, in the form of an annotated bibliography, ending each chapter. Pitching well to his undergraduate readers, Firth explains terms as he uses them, and provides a useful glossary at the end of the book as well.

The book is strongest when Firth writes about the South Pacific (which given his background is no surprise), particularly in the section on 'intervention and state building', where he focuses on Australian intervention in East Timor, Bougainville, Fiji, Solomon Islands and Tonga. But Firth is ambivalent on Australia's intervention in the Pacific because

   Australian state builders are political actors themselves,
   empowering some people at the expense of others, and influencing
   political outcomes. That is why the whole idea of
   state building, however humanitarian in motive, remains
   contested, and why Australia's policy of regional intervention
   may not endure. 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Australia in International Politics: An Introduction to Australian Foreign Policy (3Rd Edition)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.