In His Book Challenging Beliefs, Professor Tim Noakes Takes Issue with and Contradicts Many Aspects of Conventional Wisdom and Accepted Medical Practice. Some of What He Says May Well Be True and His Views on the Contribution of Refined Carbohydrates to the Obesity Epidemic Are Almost Certainly Correct

Cape Times (South Africa), September 14, 2012 | Go to article overview

In His Book Challenging Beliefs, Professor Tim Noakes Takes Issue with and Contradicts Many Aspects of Conventional Wisdom and Accepted Medical Practice. Some of What He Says May Well Be True and His Views on the Contribution of Refined Carbohydrates to the Obesity Epidemic Are Almost Certainly Correct


In his book Challenging Beliefs, Professor Tim Noakes takes issue with and contradicts many aspects of conventional wisdom and accepted medical practice. Some of what he says may well be true and his views on the contribution of refined carbohydrates to the obesity epidemic are almost certainly correct.

However we believe he goes too far in suggesting that a switch to a high-fat, high-protein diet is advisable for all persons. Such a diet may have allowed him to lose weight and run faster but its widespread implementation is contrary to the recommendations of all major cardiovascular societies worldwide, is of unproven benefit and may be dangerous for patients with coronary heart disease or persons at risk of coronary heart disease.

Further his questioning of the value of cholesterol lowering agents (statins) is at best unwise and may be harmful to many patients on appropriate treatment. The very strong evidence is that statins in patients with coronary artery disease improve mortality (they make you live longer). Multiple placebo-controlled studies have confirmed this.

Generic statins are now cheap and should be widely used. The side-effect profile of these agents is benign and there is general agreement that their benefits far outweigh any minor risks associated with their use.

Noakes is welcome to his views. As an academic it would be appropriate for him to air these and to debate them in an academic forum and the medical literature where they could be critically evaluated and challenged by his peers.

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In His Book Challenging Beliefs, Professor Tim Noakes Takes Issue with and Contradicts Many Aspects of Conventional Wisdom and Accepted Medical Practice. Some of What He Says May Well Be True and His Views on the Contribution of Refined Carbohydrates to the Obesity Epidemic Are Almost Certainly Correct
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