National Fund-Raisers Fall Short

By Larmondin, Leanne | Anglican Journal, February 1997 | Go to article overview

National Fund-Raisers Fall Short


Larmondin, Leanne, Anglican Journal


Although final figures aren't in yet, donations to the major national church appeal and the Primate's Fund have declined significantly; a third appeal by the Anglican Journal has surpassed last year's total.

Anglican Appeal, the national church's fund-raiser that supports work in northern dioceses and overseas mission, had raised $608,000 by the end of November, little more than half of its target of $1,185,000.

In 1995, the appeal raised $1,041,000. Even allowing for year-end givings, co-ordinator Karen Walters says the trend is downward. Last year, Anglican Appeal provided 13 per cent of the national church's grant to the Council of the North (comprised of the financially assisted nine northern dioceses and the Archdeaconry of Labrador). The appeal also provided 13 per cent of the national church's overseas mission grants. If it does poorly, there are serious consequences to grant recipients, said Suzanne Lawson, head of financial development of the national church.

Like Anglican Appeal, the Primate's World Relief and Development Fund is awaiting the last of its 1996 receipts. A time between when donations are received and when they reach the fund means that up to $500,000 can be collected in January, said Primate's Fund director Robin Gibson.

The fund's target for 1996 was $2.45 million. By December, it had received $1.8 million. "We're a little under where we expected to be," said Mr. Gibson. "But we're not far under. We're not in an absolute panic. There's a reasonable chance we'll make our budget."

Mr. Gibson said PWRDF and other agencies are noticing a downward trend in charitable donations.

The reason is a combination of factors, said Mr. Gibson; an older population, slow economic recovery and a stronger awareness of the needs of Canadians.

"I'm not sure people are giving less money," he said, "but if you've got $500 to give away, maybe you're going to give half to overseas work and half to a local soup kitchen. …

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