The Mail


'Muslim Rage'

Ayaan Hirsi Ali's words are truly prescient; they resonate with the force of reason. The West's policy of appeasement in response to radical Islam is a grave mistake both for us and ultimately for those Muslims who have a more moderate and peaceful worldview.

Dana Eddings, Washington, N.C.

I am highly disappointed that Newsweek would choose to exacerbate an already deplorable situation by printing an Islamaphobic cover. How does this article help?

Yasmina Blackburn, Elk Grove Village, Ill.

'Speed Trap'

I'd like to ask Andrew Blum exactly what constitutes a "free-speech over-step" and who is qualified or authorized to define such a thing? If the definition is based, even in part, on the reaction of the Muslim masses to whatever is being said, then the mullahs and imams have won an important victory in their war against Western culture in general and the United States Constitution in particular, and freedom is one step closer to death. As reprehensible as the Innocence of Muslims YouTube video might be, the responsibility for the violent demonstrations that have spread throughout the Muslim world, and the death of our Libyan diplomats, rests solely on the shoulders of those who chose to behave violently, with all the emotional maturity of a spoiled 10-year-old child, and the religious leaders that spurred them on and fanned the flames of anarchy.

Barry Myers, Newport, Mich.

'A Bully Overplays His Hand'

Peter Beinart portrays Benjamin Netanyahu as being obsessed with the Iranian nuclear program. I disagree. Like his predecessor, Ariel Sharon, what Bibi is really obsessed with is his hold on power. Thanks to the support of the extreme right wing in Israel, Bibi's grip is holding. But history will take care of him in due time.

Charles Schermerhorn, Lompoc, Calif.

Israel isn't worried about dominance; it's worried about its very existence. …

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