Elmhurst Art Museum a Place to Connect with Artists

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Elmhurst Art Museum a Place to Connect with Artists


Byline: Stephanie Grow Elmhurst Art Museum

The Elmhurst Art Museum is a place to connect with the finest contemporary artists, see compelling exhibitions, experience art-making in our studios and enjoy programs and events on free evenings.

Exhibiting late 20th- and early 21st-century American and contemporary art, the museum offers exhibitions of the best contemporary regional and national artists and an opportunity to bring the public face-to-face with the person behind the artwork they experience. Each season brings new exhibitions and programs to nourish the curious spirit.

This fall, a museum-wide ceramics exhibition, "No Rules: Contemporary Clay," explores ceramic tradition and creative developments. The exhibit concentrates on clay-based work of a nonfunctional nature and includes an international group of artists.

Taking a variety of forms -- from large- and small-scale sculpture to community-based walks to performance and video -- the work in this exhibition underscores artists' enduring relationship with clay and its adaptability to contemporary concerns.

The McCormick House, designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in 1952, transports visitors back to the birth of modernism. One of only three single-family residences built in the United States by pioneering architect Mies, the McCormick House is a significant element of the museum.

The living/dining wing serves as both a furnished living room and exhibition space with seating for visitors that includes furnishings by some of the most important and innovative American designers of the postwar period, including Mies himself, George Nelson and Florence Knoll, and groupings of ceramics, functional objects and art. …

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