Sister Souljah

By Hruby, Patrick | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 8, 2012 | Go to article overview

Sister Souljah


Hruby, Patrick, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Patrick Hruby, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Race for the White House produces two things: lots of attack ads and unwitting overnight celebrities. Think Sister Souljah. Joe the Plumber. Clint Eastwood's empty chair. The little boy who spelled potato without an e, only to have Vice President Dan Quayle helpfully correct him. With election season again upon us, The Washington Times continues its series remembering some of our favorite campaign one-hit wonders and asking: Where are they now?

Then: A Rutgers graduate and House legislative intern turned Afrocentric rapper and social activist, Sister Souljah courted controversy via sharp-tongued criticism of racism and the federal government. Two of her videos - most notably The Final Solution: Slavery's Back in Effect, in which she rapped, if there are any good white people, I haven't met them - were banned by MTV. When Ms. Souljah responded to a 1992 newspaper interview question about Rodney King and the Los Angeles riots by stating if black people kill black people every day, why not have a week and kill white people? Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton pounced, denouncing her in front of Jesse Jackson's Rainbow Coalition. The term Sister Souljah Moment has since entered the lexicon as shorthand for politicians publicly repudiating individuals or ideas seen as extremist and attached to themselves, their candidacy or their party.

Now: Born Lisa Williamson, Ms. Souljah is married with a son and is enjoying a second career as the author of the best-selling urban lit novel The Coldest Winder Ever and a series of books about the globe-trotting adventures of a Sudanese Muslim man named Midnight. …

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