Huron Calls on Lay People

By Bettson, Bob | Anglican Journal, November 1999 | Go to article overview

Huron Calls on Lay People


Bettson, Bob, Anglican Journal


SIX YEARS AGO Archbishop Percy O'Driscoll of the Diocese of Huron hit the headlines in the secular and church press when he warned that the Anglican Church was in grave danger.

Speaking to a synod of the Diocese of Niagara after his election as Metropolitan of Ontario, the Archbishop said "You and I and others like us have about two generations left. And at the end of two generations there will not be enough people to say there is an Anglican Church alive in this country. I'm not trying to scare you. I believe that on the basis of the information I have, I'm telling the truth."

Archbishop O'Driscoll stands by that warning as the millennium approaches.

"There'll still be an Anglican church, but we might be so spotty on the ground that it'll be hard to see it as the Anglican Church of Canada we know," he says.

As bishop of Canada's southernmost diocese, which includes 234 congregations in 165 parishes with 61,000 parishioners, however, Archbishop O'Driscoll senses that things have stabilized since 1993 when he warned of the demographic dangers facing the church.

In the Diocese of Huron, a number of parishes are experiencing growth, while others are holding their own. In some rural parishes there is a continuing decline, primarily due to a shift in population to urban areas.

One of the central challenges the diocese faces is developing new and better relationships with First Nations people. "We've been working closely on that for a number of years with our 10 Native congregations, and we think we're building a whole new relationship," Archbishop Driscoll said.

Native issues have gained new prominence in the diocese since a group of First Nations people last year launched a class action lawsuit against the Anglican Church of Canada, the Diocese of Huron and the federal government. The lawsuit names the diocese because of its role in running the Mohawk Institute, a Native residential school near the Six Nations Reserve in Brantford, Ont. Unlike many of the other outstanding lawsuits across Canada, this one focuses on an argument of cultural genocide rather than specific allegations of abuse against particular staff.

Archbishop O'Driscoll says apart from having spent more than $100,000 in legal and research fees, the lawsuit hasn't had a large impact on the diocese.

"We know it will take a long time to move through the courts."

In the meantime the diocese is making greater efforts than ever before to address the needs of its Native congregations. A recent synod voted to recommend the appointment, for the first time, of an archdeacon responsible for Native parishes. The synod also supported efforts to facilitate the training and appointment of Native clergy to Native parishes.

An educational program to encourage dialogue between aboriginal and non-aboriginal people will be developed by members of the Lenne, Lenape, Algonkian and Iroquoian Council of the diocese. This effort was endorsed by synod.

The diocese traces its roots back to 1857, when it was carved out of the old Diocese of Toronto, to serve the 13 counties of the western part of Upper Canada. The first bishop was Benjamin Cronyn, who was elected by a synod of clergy and lay delegates in 1857. It was the first time in the history of the Anglican communion that a diocese had elected its own bishop.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Huron Calls on Lay People
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.