The Effects of Traffic Accidents on the Emergence of Psychological Disorders among Drivers of "3Rd' Category": Private License in Jordan "A Field Research"

By Ghoneem, Khowla Abd Al Raheem | Studies in Sociology of Science, June 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Effects of Traffic Accidents on the Emergence of Psychological Disorders among Drivers of "3Rd' Category": Private License in Jordan "A Field Research"


Ghoneem, Khowla Abd Al Raheem, Studies in Sociology of Science


INTRODUCTION

Traffic accidents are considered modern problems which are causing enormous human and material losses to many people and resulting of them many temporary and permanent injuries and they cause enormous damages to the public and private properties. It is not an exaggeration to say that victims of the road accidents are more than the victims of wars and terrorist operations in the world.

Some statistics indicated that the number of deaths resulting from car accidents were over (300) thousand people annually, and the estimated number of the injured people between the (10-15) million. Moreover, statistics indicated that the numbers of injuries in the United States alone were more than three and a half million yearly (Butler et al., 1999).

It is sad that (10%) of those injured people are children and the percentage of children who are exposed to injuries caused by traffic accidents in some countries might be increasing to reach more than (20%) as indicated in the Bulletin of Jordanian Traffic Institute. Some reports indicated that more than (300,000) children are exposed to injuries caused by road accidents in the United States alone (Hauschildt, 2002).

What should be mentioned in this regard is that the victims of traffic accidents in the developing world countries are much more comparing with those in the developed countries as referred to in bulletin of the World Health Organization (Gender & Health, (2002). All governments make efforts to reduce accidents and thus reduce their negative effects. It is unfortunate that the negative effects of car accidents are linked to the minds of many as material loss, pain and suffering physical disabilities only, but the psychological effects perhaps because of its disappearance of the human eye wasn't paid attention to and was ignored by many other people even by those who linked to researchers in the third world. It is logical that physical injuries and some psychological symptoms resulting directly from the accident receive priority in care and attention, but scientific researches confirm that some of the road accidents or those who witnessed them could show that they subsequently cause psychological disorders which may develop into severe symptoms (Butler et al., 1999).

Although the injured in traffic accidents may receive some kind of social support of their natural resources like relatives and friends in attempting to ease the negative effects resulting from traffic accidents, there are things we must draw attention to, which are:

I. All the people who were exposed to such incidents do not receive the appropriate degree of support.

II. Ordinary people had been unaware of the type of the appropriate or desired social support for the victim (of an accident).

III. Professional specialists have the necessary knowledge to monitor the indicators or symptoms which may be hidden from ordinary people, or difficult for them to interpret, especially in the light of the available knowledge. Although many of the symptoms resulting from traffic accidents do not appear immediately after the accident. It should be noted here that psychological wounds which inflicted on those who are exposed to traffic accidents may stay with them for a long time even after physical injuries heal.

Perhaps the reason behind some athletes not recovering to their previous levels of performance before their exposure to an injury is psychological wounds are not less damaging than physical injuries; they even might be more serious in their effects. It is striking that the insurance companies in the developed countries pay profitable compensations for the effects of psychological wounds resulting from car accidents (Butler et al., 1999). 7 In this context, traffic accidents partially result of violations committed by an individual who hurt another individual or group of members of the society. Perhaps the gravity of the dangers of traffic accidents increases the awareness and stimulates efforts to alleviate the psychological effects. …

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