The Mail


'My Proof of Heaven'

I found Dr. Eben Alexander's journey in consciousness (Oct. 15) thrilling. It confirmed what saints and sages, East and West, have been telling us for centuries: that the reality of heaven exists within us and that infinite wisdom, compassion, and love are innate to the human heart and mind. Thank you, Dr. Alexander, for sharing your life-transforming experience with us!

Judy Booth, Livingston Manor, N.Y.

As the former editor in chief of Psychology Today, I know how hard it can be to sell magazines. But how do you get from a neurosurgeon's report about his near-death experience to the cover headline? I've met several "coma converts," and they are each as enthusiastic about their wacky recollections as your author is, but they all have different recollections. See the problem? More than 80 percent of near-death-experience survivors remember nothing at all. Both Dr. Alexander and Newsweek's editors drew faulty conclusions from his experience. The only legitimate conclusion is that we know very little about how the brain works, especially after trauma.

Robert Epstein, Ph.D., American Institute for Behavioral Research and Technology, Vista, Calif.

I'm grateful that you presented the article this past week by Dr. Eben Alexander. As I now pass my 80th year, I remember well my experience with near death when I was 16 when my sailboat turned over in a storm in April on Long Island Sound. I swam more than a mile in freezing water to the breakwater, where I was dashed by the waves and fell unconscious. I came back to life in New Rochelle Hospital. That event was life-changing since I also experienced much the same sensations Dr. Alexander described in his terrific article.

Malcolm T. Hepworth, Port Townsend, Wash.

'You Call That a Scoop? …

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