My Favorite Mistake: Sir Richard Branson

Newsweek, October 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

My Favorite Mistake: Sir Richard Branson


Byline: Sir Richard Branson

On his banana-boat rescue.

Back in 1984, we started the airline Virgin Atlantic with one plane. We didn't have the advertising money to spend to compete with British Airways, so I kept trying to think of a way to get us on the map without spending too much money.

I decided to build a boat, the Virgin Atlantic Challenger, with the idea of trying to break the record for the fastest speed ever across the Atlantic Ocean. There is an award for this called the Blue Riband, and the last holder was an American boat. I thought that if I could get the Blue Riband back for Britain, it would help our new young airline.

Even though my wife, Joan, was eight months' pregnant, I began the trip and hoped to get back in time. It started very well. We were breaking the record, and then about 200 miles from England, after nearly three and a half days at sea, the boat broke in two. The crew and I ended up in life rafts and were rescued by a banana boat that was heading back to Jamaica. A couple who happened to be on the boat put their arms around me and said, "You poor boy, you just had a newborn son. Would you like to see a picture of him?" And they showed me my son on the front page of the Daily Mail newspaper in England. Meanwhile, as helicopters and the press began flying over, the only thing that was sticking out of the water was the big Virgin sign on the boat.

So that was my favorite mistake. But the English people like the underdog. They don't like people who are always successful the first time out. And I think the trip became a much, much bigger story than if it had been successful. Our airline took out a full-page ad with a photo of the boat sticking out of the water. …

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