Enrollment Explosion: The Oro Grande (Calif.) School District Has Grown Dramatically Thanks to Creative Charter Schools

By Mellon, Ericka | District Administration, October 2012 | Go to article overview

Enrollment Explosion: The Oro Grande (Calif.) School District Has Grown Dramatically Thanks to Creative Charter Schools


Mellon, Ericka, District Administration


When Joseph Andreasen joined the rural Oro Grande School District in 2006 as assistant superintendent, he was one of seven employees. The one-elementary-school district was short on students and therefore on cash, because state funding is based largely on enrollment.

Since then, however, the southern California school system, located about 90 miles northeast of Los Angeles, has exploded. The staff numbers more than 250, enrollment has skyrocketed from roughly 110 students to more than 3,700, and the budget has stabilized, with $12 million in savings and reserves to pay off debt.

To grow enrollment and steady the finances, Andreasen oversaw the creation of two in-district charter schools that offer different instructional models meant to attract and retain students.

"People are looking for a choice," says Andreasen, who was promoted to superintendent in late 2010. "That's really what charters are--a choice for parents and students."

Charter Schools to Rescue

Andreasen says that his predecessor, former superintendent Kim Moore, recruited him specifically to start the charter schools because Andreasen had served previously as director of curriculum for the California Charter Academy (which has since closed) and on the board of Excelsior Education Center, a charter in nearby Victorville.

When Andreasen arrived on the job in Oro Grande, the district operated a single elementary school. Junior high and high school students traveled about five miles away to the Victor Valley Union High School District in Victorville. Though they were not far away, the schools were large, with enrollments of 1,600 and 3,500, respectively. The Oro Grande students were used to a small setting; they struggled in the Victor Valley schools and became lost in the crowd, Andreasen says. Oro Grande district leaders wanted to change that.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

To expand Oro Grande to grade 12, the district, under California law, would have had to place a measure on the ballot and win voter approval--a risky venture that would have cost the cash-strapped district $20,000, according to Andreasen. Instead, Moore charged Andreasen with creating the charter schools, a move that didn't require a public referendum.

One of the charters, Riverside Preparatory School, now caters to students in elementary through high school with a college-prep curriculum, a longer school day, project-based learning, and a no-homework policy. The other charter, Mojave River Academy, offers at-risk students--including teen morns and those who have been expelled from other districts--the option of mostly doing their work from home. The charter schools have proven so popular with parents and students that some choose to leave their neighborhood districts and take bus rides as long as 35 miles each way to Oro Grande.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"We have grown a little faster than I thought we would, but I think it shows there is a real desire from parents for something different that we seem to be providing," Andreasen says.

Good Bet

Andreasen, a 30-year educator who began his career as a kindergarten teacher, took the Oro Grande job despite a gamble: If he didn't recruit students to the new charter schools, he wouldn't get paid (no students equals no state funding), and thus, he would lose his job. It turned out be a good bet. Mojave River opened for the 2006-2007 school year with 288 students and last year enrolled 1,300. Riverside Prep opened in the fall of 2007 with 358 students and now has more than six times that many pupils.

At the outset, Andreasen took out a full-page ad in the local newspaper muting Riverside. …

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