A Turn of the Page

By Brown, Tina | Newsweek, October 29, 2012 | Go to article overview

A Turn of the Page


Brown, Tina, Newsweek


Byline: Tina Brown

Newsweek embraces the digital future.

This is a bittersweet moment in Newsweek's immensely proud history. As we have announced--and as has been widely and passionately reported by the media in the U.S. and abroad--the magazine will go all digital in 2013. The Dec. 31 issue of Newsweek will be its last as a print magazine.

Bittersweet, I say. Bitter, because I'd be lying if I didn't confess to a bruised heart. I love print: always have, always will do. Sweet, because we are rising spiritedly to a challenge, not wringing our hands in impotent despair over the way modern life--and modern reading habits--have rendered our print edition unviable.

Our decision is driven by our optimism, our belief in ourselves--and our belief, above all, in our readers. You have increasingly adopted digital and, in effect, we are following you. Newsweek Global, as the new all-digital publication will be called, will be a single, worldwide edition of Newsweek, produced for a restless, news-hungry, opinion-forming audience that pays keen attention to world events. Just like the print magazine, Newsweek Global will be supported by paid subscription. It will be available for tablet, Web, and mobile devices, with selected content available on thedailybeast.com (for more information, see p. 4 ).

In 2008, we launched The Daily Beast with the support of IAC. Two years later, the ambitious, upstart Beast married the iconic Newsweek. The Washington Post Co. had sold the magazine for one dollar to Dr. Sidney Harman, who sadly died less than three months after the 50-50 merger.

In the 20 months since Newsweek joined forces with the Beast, a moribund magazine got its mojo back. The staff and writers, led by executive editor Justine Rosenthal, restored Newsweek's journalistic heft and its readers' engagement. Subscription renewals in print increased for the first time after a five-year decline. The covers of Newsweek again are a weekly media event, the source of discussion and, yes, controversy. Our covers are shared avidly on Facebook, and among a 1.8 million Twitter following. The Daily Beast and Newsweek have demonstrated eye-catching growth online, attracting more than 15 million unique visitors each month, a 70 percent increase in the past year alone, a healthy portion of it generated each week by Newsweek's very strong, very stylish journalism. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Turn of the Page
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.