Occupational Therapy in Acute Care

By Lu, Frank I. -Chien | New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2012 | Go to article overview

Occupational Therapy in Acute Care


Lu, Frank I. -Chien, New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy


Smith-Gabai, H. (Ed.). (2011). : AOTA Press.

ISBN: 978-1-56900-271-1

AOTA Online Member Price: $109.00 US

Non-Member Price: $154.00 US

Store Amazon.com USD Price: $154.00 US

I am very excited to review this long awaited book from the United States of America. For a long time I believe many occupational therapists like myself, have used non-occupational therapy focused textbooks (e.g. Medicine and Physiotherapy) in their acute care practice, whilst wishing a book was available that was explicitly written to guide them to navigate the high pressure, fast paced tertiary healthcare facility from an occupational therapy perspective.

In this book Smith-Gabai (2011) clearly outlines that "working in a hospital setting can be challenging and frustrating because the environment remains predominantly hierarchical and paternalistic (with strong emphasis of a medical model)" (p. xi). Occupational therapists may often experience ambivalence about their role in the acute care setting (Griffin, 1993; Griffin & McConnell 2001) because of "the difficulty to reconcile the value of medical model system with core values of occupational therapy and the recognition engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupation is the most effective way to empower patients, facilitate independence and advance health" (Smith-Gabai, 2011, p. xi). Smith-Gabai positively states that the medical model can be congruent with occupational therapy philosophy and that working in this kind of setting offers us unique opportunities to be both occupation-based and client-centred in our practice.

Occupational therapists who practice in acute care have unique challenges in providing evaluation and intervention, including the patient's medical instability, the limitations in physical settings, assessing the appropriateness of referrals and requests, and the constrained timeframes for evaluation and intervention. Smith-Gabai (2011) acknowledged that it is an uneasy task for occupational therapists in acute care to look beyond specific medical condition and see the whole person and each has his own occupational profile. Still this is the key that separated our profession from other disciplines as we take into account of patient's physical, mental, psychosocial and spiritual needs when planning interventions and making discharge recommendations with the aim at enabling patient to reclaim important role and routine. Therefore, having an understanding of medical conditions and how illness affects occupational performance areas from both bottom-up and top-down approaches is essential for occupational therapists practicing in acute care.

This American-based book is a comprehensive evidence-based book on occupational therapy practice in the acute care setting. It will help therapists to demystify medical conditions and typical issues when working in this setting. It is written in easy-to understand language and terms to support students, novice, and expert occupational therapists to recognise and understand the physiology and pathology of body systems, common medical procedures and management, and how they are linked to the practice of occupational therapy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Occupational Therapy in Acute Care
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.