Obama May Have Embraced Exceptionalism

By Hurt, Charles | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 24, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama May Have Embraced Exceptionalism


Hurt, Charles, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Good news, America! Just three years and 351 days into his presidency, President Obama has finally accepted the concept of American exceptionalism in the world.

America remains the one indispensable nation, Mr. Obama said during Monday night's debate. Perhaps he meant the one indispensable nation in the Western Hemisphere or the one indispensable nation in North America except for Canada.

At the very least, it was a major improvement over the time Mr. Obama was asked directly if he believed in the proud concept that America has a unique responsibility in the world as a beacon of freedom and individual liberty.

I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism, he said. Which is to say, he doesn't believe in American exceptionalism at all except as some self-delusion that so many countries suffer.

And that wasn't the only good news at the final presidential debate that focused on foreign policy.

After years of dissing Israel, romancing Islamic regimes and apologizing for America's involvement in the Middle East, Mr. Obama announced that indeed he still considers Israel an ally and he would stand with the country if it is attacked by Iran with a nuclear bomb.

This, of course, was great news. But then he cast doubt on his own sanity when he followed that up with a claim about how he has developed the strongest military and intelligence cooperation between our two countries in history. If this is true, he really might want to let Israel know.

America can also take solace knowing that Mr. Obama announced that the doomsday plan arrived at in Congress to make $500 billion in devastating cuts to the military will not happen.

That's great, but where was Mr.

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