Sisters Speak out on Visitation: Commissioned Study Collects Experiences of US Women Religious during Vatican Inquiry

By Ryan, Zoe | National Catholic Reporter, October 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Sisters Speak out on Visitation: Commissioned Study Collects Experiences of US Women Religious during Vatican Inquiry


Ryan, Zoe, National Catholic Reporter


The fourth and final phase of the Vatican's apostolic visitation of the communities of women religious in the United States, announced in 2009, has yet to emerge. In the meantime, some women religious sought to compile their feelings about the visitation, since the only public women religious perspective on the investigation has been in the media.

The nine women religious--from different congregations--compiled the voices of the women religious about the experience in their commissioned study, "The Apostolic Visitation as Experienced by U.S. Women Religious."

"I think as a group, we had a really deep desire to enable women religious to speak in their own voice collectively," said St. Joseph of Carondelet Sr. Jean Wincek.

"We wanted to preserve this story in a way that will allow people 30 or 40 years from now to go back and look at a bona fide study. It was our intention really to have this data collected so there would be an appropriate study done on this process," she said.

In the months before the survey was sent out in March 2011, a few women religious of different congregations were talking at a conference assembly--not a formal discussion, but just passing time in the hallway--about their experiences going through the visitation. Out of that discussion came the idea to record the experiences of women religious in one report.

"I think we're a product of the very thing we're talking about. We--the grass-roots group is a visible product of the experience we're trying to convey," Congregation of St. Joseph Sr. Nancy Conway said about the group directing the survey.

Although the Leadership Conference of Women Religious has been going through a different Vatican assessment, the group wants to clarify that the two are in no way related.

"We're not in any way speaking about LCWR and the doctrinal assessment," Ursuline Sr. Lynn Jarrell said. "We're talking about the process started by [the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life] called the apostolic visitation of women religious. We're not an official group. We're a grass-roots group that wanted to gather the story."

The nine women enlisted the services of a sociologist from Canisius College in Buffalo, N.Y., to analyze the results. The questionnaire was sent out in March 2011 to the 143 congregations who said they would participate All the completed forms were returned by June 2011.

The report was a questionnaire for all the women religious communities to complete. It had about 18 questions with a number of subquestions that provided a very "complex" study and a substantial amount of data, said Margaret McCarthy, the sociologist who worked on the report.

McCarthy drew "dozens and dozens" of themes from the information in the questionnaire. Similar experiences were the majority, but there were exceptions.

"As you might imagine, the responses are across the board. ... Everyone experienced the apostolic visitation in their own way, but you can see some themes come through," McCarthy said.

The process that she used was mostly qualitative, although there is some quantitative analysis. "The vast majority [of questions] are qualitative in nature, describing an experience in response to a question.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sisters Speak out on Visitation: Commissioned Study Collects Experiences of US Women Religious during Vatican Inquiry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.